Lyricist of chartbusters like ‘Badri Ki Dulhaniya’, ‘Aaj Ki Party’ craves for soulful song | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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Lyricist of chartbusters like ‘Badri Ki Dulhaniya’, ‘Aaj Ki Party’ craves for soulful song

What great lyricists have penned and composed in early years could not be matched. Such is the magic of that era that singers in reality shows and live performances sing old songs, says Shabbir Ahmed.

lucknow Updated: Apr 12, 2017 15:14 IST
Deep Saxena
Lyricist Shabbir Ahmed with reality show singer Tanya Tiwari.
Lyricist Shabbir Ahmed with reality show singer Tanya Tiwari.(Dheeraj Dhawan/HT Photo)

Jaunpur-born lyricist Shabbir Ahmed has penned chartbusters like ‘Jumme Ke Raat’, ‘Badri Ki Dulhaniya’ and ‘Aaj Ki Party’. But, the writer is craving to write more soulful songs contrary to the peppy ones being offered to him.

“I have written ‘Teri Meri Prem Kahani’ in ‘Bodyguard’ which fetched me an award. I also wrote ‘Ek Baat Kahoon Kya Ijazat Hai’ and ‘Tera Chehra’. I have penned some soulful numbers too but in the absence of proper promotion they did not do well. People know me more for ‘Aashiq surrender hua, jumme ke raat, ‘Soni ke nakhre’ and songs in similar zone,” he tells HT City during his recent visit to Lucknow. He hopes and wishes to get soulful songs to write.

Talking about his journey and his mentor Salman Khan, he says, “My early days were full of struggle. We used to get dal-chalwal and sabzi when some guests came else it was like…(pauses). I was able to study till Class X. Such has been my early life but when I reached Mumbai the one man who supported me was superstar Salman Khan. So, I write songs according to him — as per his personality and public image. Soni de nakhre, Aaj ke party, Jumme ke raat all these songs were written according to his character (in films) but in future you will surely get to listen some better songs,” he says.

‘I want to fulfil my mother’s dream’
  • Reality show finalist Tanya Tiwari feels lucky to be mentored by three judges Himesh Reshm-iyya, Javed Ali and Neha Kakkar and 30 talented jury.She does not come from a musical family but has been inclined towards singing since childhood. “No one is a singer in my family. My mother used to listen to good music and wanted me to sing so I was given training since early age. Now that she is no more, I want to fulfil her dream and win the show,” says Tanya.

His songs are full of folk music from Uttar Pradesh. “Holi flavour (bolo sara-rara) in Badri Ki Dulhani, Aashiq surrender, Naino ke baan a lot of lyrics are from my maa-ki-bhoomi (motherland) that is Uttar Pradesh. I try to weave it in my songs even if they are party songs. UP folk and language is full of romance and has always ruled the film industry and I am only carrying the tradition forward.”

Talking about yesteryears songs he says, “What great lyricists have penned and composed in early years could not be matched. Such is the magic of that era that singers in reality shows and live performances sing old songs. But, today the taste has changed and we deliver what is demanded.”

“We don’t have a choice. Lyricists are asked to write commercially viable numbers and if we don’t, the line of writers is very long. So, it’s a compulsion for us to write as per the demand,” he adds.

The lyricist says, “One song is given to four writers and the best one is selected. It’s even tougher for composers and singers where multiple people are roped in. But then it keeps us on the edge to deliver our best with honesty.”

Shabbir is non-committal about his future projects. “There are a lot of projects but can’t name them till the film is released and you see your song in it. Today, if a film is delayed or makers get a new song then the song gets replaced very fast and is re-shot,” he shares.

“It was after I appeared as a jury in SaReGaMaPa Little Champs that people started recognising me though I have spent 13 years in the film industry now,” he signs off.

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