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My vote is for youth power

I would like to see Uttar Pradesh fulfill its potential. For this, you would have to make people wake-up. Primary education and nurturing it is very important. When I say nurturing, it means of both mind and body as they are complimentary to each other. Sudhir Mishra writes.

lucknow Updated: Jun 28, 2011 19:43 IST
Sudhir Mishra

I would like to see Uttar Pradesh fulfill its potential. For this, you would have to make people wake-up. Primary education and nurturing it is very important. When I say nurturing, it means of both mind and body as they are complimentary to each other. For this, those who have potential to work for peoples’ cause should join politics.

Youths will have to come forward as it’s only they who can bring about the change. And here at UP we have a very big young population.

Another aspect that’s utmost important is total eradication of caste system and politics over it. A social revolution is needed and those oppressed for centuries should be now given equal rights. There should be proper redressal system for grievances. ‘Izzat’ (respect) for each and every individual should be provided.

Also, it needs to be seen that bath baby is not done away with bath water.

As per the entertainment industry, UP has amazing culture. There is no lack of location for shooting, but I strongly feel that there should be a single window for clearance so that the industry can flourish here. This will enable local talents to interact with established players. The set-up should be such that one can come and work without any fear.

A hi-tech set-up is needed so that people from this part of the world don’t need to come to Mumbai to get their work done.

Making a pool of people from UP (like myself, Vishal Bharadwaj, Anubhav Sinha, Anurag and Abhinav Kashyap, Muzaffar bhai and others) so that they come and work here — in a way giving it back to the state. And that is very much possible.

(The writer is a well-known film-maker)

‘Be active in fight against corruption’

Allahabad: If you need to get work done in UP, you have to bribe the official concerned, says retired high court judge, GirdharMalviya. After retirement, Malviya has worked with severalinstitutions only to discover that corruption is deep rooted in thestate. On several occasions he was also asked to bribe officials toget his work done, but he refused.

Malviya is determined to fightcorruption at its very roots.

He believes that corruption should notbe encouraged even at the lowest level.According to Malviya, 88 % of the politicians in the country don’twant to fight against corruption because of their selfish interests.He also said the problem is that people of the country lack the willto fight against corruption.

They need to come forward and participateactively in the fight against corruption.

Malviya also feels the work culture needs to improve in the state.The work environment should be more professional, only then will thestate progress. He said people have a laid back attitude towards work,especially in the public sector, which slows down the growth of ourstate.

(BK Singh)

Why is education not on the poll agenda?

Ever since independence, ‘roti, kapda aur makaan’ has beenthe major concern for an average Indian. Politicians have beenexploiting this sentiment for the last six decades, especially duringelections.

But why is education not an important issue during thepolls, questions Prof Yogeshwar Tewari of the history department, Allahabad University.

Leaders like Jawahar Lal Nehru understood theimportance of education and went on to establish the IITs. UGC wasformed for higher education along with All India Council of Technical Education and Medical Council of India, said Tewari. People have begun to realise the importance of education over a period of time, which is why we see initiatives like Sarv Shiksha Abhiyan being taken.

UPA may have introduced the Right to Education Act, buteducation is still not on the agenda of most of the politicalparties.

RN Misra, a professor in ophthalmology said barring a few politicians,most of them are not well-educated themselves. Therefore they don’twant to focus on education during their election campaigns as it wouldhighlight their own inadequacies.

“One can’t expect to see politicians,who hurl shoes at each other and use unparliamentary language in theParliament to talk about the need for education,” added Tewari.