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Celebrate Diwali with the best Indian sweets, and learn to make them too

Almost every state in India has its own varieties of sweets and savouries. From West Bengal to Tamil Nadu, here’s a list of Diwali sweets that you must try.

more lifestyle Updated: Nov 10, 2015 16:21 IST
Hindustan Times
Diwali

Diwali sweets from across Indian states that you just have to try. (Shutterstock)

So there’s still a day to go and you couldn’t have possibly eaten all the yummy Diwali decadence already. So we’ve compiled a list of Diwali sweets from across Indian states that you just have to try. You’ll know why the Bengalis love to eat that Nariyal Ladoo while the South Indians love their Jangiris. And the best part? You’ll know how to make them too!

Read: Food and festivities: Getting nostalgic about Dipavali

Karnataka: Mysore Pak

Mysore Pak is a combination of three ingredients – ghee, sugar and gram flour.

First made in the kitchens of the Mysore Palace, the Mysore Pak is a combination of three ingredients – ghee, sugar and gram flour. Considered the King of Sweets in the south, neither Dusshera nor Diwali are complete without this sweet.

West Bengal: Nariyal Laddoo

Nariyal laddoo is served to Goddess Kali on Diwali.

The most essential festive mithai from the Bengali repertoire is called Narkel Naru or the Nariyal Laddoo. Fresh coconut cooked in milk and sugar makes the most chewy and delectable sweetmeat and is offered to Goddess Kali, who is worshipped on Diwali day.

Rajasthan: Kalakand

Kalakand is considered one of the purest mithai.

This popular sweet is made with curdled milk and sugar and flavoured with either cardamom or saffron. Because there’s no additional fat or other additions, Kalakand is considered one of the purest mithai and is served during the festivities.

Read: Diwali etiquettes: Let there be light, ladoos and sensitivity

Tamil Nadu: Jangiri

Imarti is a traditional Diwali sweet made with urad dal.

Called Imarti as well, this traditional Diwali sweet is made with urad dal. What you really need is piping skills! As the brother of another sweetmeat -the jalebi – the jangiri has gotten a bad rap for being too sweet, but in our books, there is no such thing as too sweet.

Maharastra: Chivda

Chivda is made from beaten rice or poha with plenty of peanuts and cashew nuts.

Savoury, spicy and sweet, the Maharashtrian Chivda is one of the most classic dishes of the region. Used as both Prasad and a tea-time snack, chivda barely takes any time to make as well. The most popular chivda is made from beaten rice or poha with plenty of peanuts and cashew nuts for the added crunch.

Orissa: Malpua

Malpua is a staple during Diwali.

Also known as Amalu, the Malpua is served as prasad at the Lord Jagannath Puri temple. While the origins seem to be in Bangladesh, this deep-fried sweet is a staple during Diwali.

Andhra Pradesh: Ribbon Pakoda

Ribbon pakoda is one of the most popular snacks during Diwali.

Apart from the sweets, savoury snacks are a big part of Diwali in the south. One of the most popular snacks is the Ribbon Pakoda which just pairs wonderfully with tea and is a great contrast to all things sweet.

Courtesy: BetterButter