Go technicolour: Rainbow food takes over Mumbai’s culinary circuit | more lifestyle | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 28, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Go technicolour: Rainbow food takes over Mumbai’s culinary circuit

Be it cupcakes, waffles, sandwiches or bagels – edible rainbows are everywhere in the city.

more lifestyle Updated: Apr 06, 2017 19:10 IST
Shradha Shahani
Rainbow Food

The vibrant hues are present everywhere now – in waffles, pancakes, macaroons, sandwiches and more.

The rainbow cake, the colourful tower of birthday cheer, has been almost every baker’s favourite for a long time now. However, the vibrant hues are present everywhere now — in waffles, pancakes, macaroons, sandwiches and more. If you are active on Instagram, chances are that your newsfeed is replete with these beautiful creations too. Type #rainbowfood, and nearly 48,000 results will turn up.

More and more restaurants are introducing dishes that are Instagram-worthy into their menus. (HT Photo)

It all started off with The Beigel Shop in London, UK, taking inspiration from the original Bagel Store in Brooklyn, USA, in 2016. The owner Scot Rossillo has been spiralising these vibrant bagels for almost 20 years now. A flock of people line up day after day to buy them. One of the bakers Osiel Escobar says, “It feels great when the customers come looking for rainbow bagels.” The Beigel Shop, which followed suit, sold nearly 1,500 bagels a day within the first few weeks.

It turns out, several restaurants in the city are introducing technicolour food into their menus. The three-month-old restaurant It Happened in New York (IHINY) in Bandra (W), which takes its inspiration from the Big Apple, couldn’t possibly miss out on the city’s favourite — the rainbow bagels.

The dessert Halo Halo at The Fatty Bao is whipped using jello, caramelised bananas, purple yam ice cream, raspberry sorbet, vanilla flan and coconut granite. (HT Photo)

A talking point

“Is a particular dish, Instagram-worthy?” seems to have become the popular deciding factor among chefs now. For instance, when chef Sanyo Vaz of IHINY, was asked why she decided to introduce rainbow food, she instantly said, “They are ‘Instagrammable’.” These creations catch the fancy of customers instantly. “An addition of colours changes the look of the dish,” says Jerson Fernandes, executive chef, Jeon, Juhu. Lima in Bandra (E) and Door No.1 in Bandra (W), too, serve colourful drinks using a combination of rum, tequila, blue curacao, orange juice and grenadine syrup.

The Rainbow Sushi at Shizusan is made with layers of fatty tuna, sweet crab, tobiko and cucumber. (HT Photo)

All things natural

Interestingly, most of these hues are obtained naturally. Fernandes, who serves up a colourful platter of kebabs, says, “The colour is obtained from an array of fruits such as mangoes and different types of berries. Shizusan in Lower Parel, too, serves a Rainbow Maki. “I have often been told that the sushi is too beautiful to eat. But the colours are acquired with layers of fatty tuna, sweet crab, tobiko and cucumber. And suddenly, it is too tempting to not eat,” says chef Paul Kinny.

Watch how Rainbow Bagels are made

Chef Prashanth Puttaswamy of The Fatty Bao, Bandra (W) and Lower Parel, on the other hand, uses an array of vegetables such as carrots, avocados, beetroot and yam, while preparing sushi. The result is an edible rainbow. At the restaurant, a colourful dessert called the Halo Halo is also whipped using jello, caramelised bananas, purple yam ice cream, raspberry sorbet, vanilla flan and coconut granite.

Follow @htlifeandstyle for more.