Action Jackson review: Full of cliches, this one is terribly, criminally bad

  • Sweta Kaushal, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
  • Updated: Dec 06, 2014 13:00 IST

Action Jackson



Ajay Devgn, Sonakshi Sinha, Yami Gautam, Manasvi Mamgai and Anand Raj



Yet another mindless action-comedy hits theatres on December 5. Prabhudheva's fifth directorial venture in Bollywood, Action Jackson has every ingredient his films have -- mindless story, gravity-defying action, cliched dialogues and funny-looking villains.


The film is about Vishi (Ajay Devgn) who is a small goon in his area but is good at heart (just like all of our heroes are). He loves beating up people to the tunes of music beats and mixes dancing with action sequences. Not weird enough? Add to that a girl Khushi (Sonakshi Sinha) who bumps into him in the changing room of a mall to see him naked. And this girl starts stalking him simply so she can see him naked again. Does that disgust you? You should wait till you know the reason -- Khushi is a clumsy girl who is believed to be unlucky and she thinks that seeing naked Ajay Devgn brings her good luck! Imagine more than fifteen minutes of a film with the heroine chasing the hero around so she can see him naked and get lucky enough to marry a guy from the US, America as she dreamily says!

So we see Vishi being chased by everyone around -- right from the local cops to well suited-booted goons and even a don sitting in Bangkok (Xavier played by Anand Raj)! Of course we don't know the reason, not at least for more than an hour into the film. It is then revealed that Vishi resembles an extremely skilled criminal Jai aka AJ. Ohk, then. So lives of the two Ajay Devgns clash and drama begins. How the duo win over the ever-scheming, superbly cunning villains is the story of Action Jackson.

The story of Action Jackson has little new to offer except, maybe for the vamp. Manasvi Mamgai plays Xavier's sister who is crazily in love with AJ - Devgn. And she literally is CRAZY. Even her first shot in the movie, we see a girl surrounded by tens of goons in a den. The girl is beaten rashly and is tied to a chair as one of the men letches and advances towards her. Right then, Devgn makes his entry and Manasvi doesn't even take a minute to change from the girl cringing under the men's advances to a woman drooling over AJ's body! Dear Manasvi, you were good as the model. Even later in the movie, she is seen as a fierce woman who cannot handle the rejection of a man.

The background music in Action Jackson seems to have been lifted straight from Sony's hit horror show Aahat. But every time she comes onscreen, the movie changes its genre from an action-comedy to horror. She always has her hair weirdly done all over her face and there is a certain dark tint to the frame whenever she is onscreen!

Watch Action Jackson review

Kunal Roy Kapur makes for an interesting comic relief in the movie that can otherwise easily be categorised as a nonsensical film. Roy does not explore any new thing and continues to harp on his image of a fat boy but he does it well. Playing the literal punching bag of Ajay Devgn as his close friend, Kunal manages to bring tickle the funny bones of the audience.

With Action Jackson, Ajay Devgn seems to have had a blast. We haven't seen him enjoy as much onscreen as he does in the film that also stars Sonakshi Sinha. Be it making fun of Sinha or aping Prabhudheva's dance steps or mouthing cliched dialogues, Ajay seems to be having the fun of his life doing it all. And that is what lessens the pain of watching a mindless film as Action Jackson.

The screenplay has its own glitches -- often one of the main characters disappears from the narrative and we are not even told later what happened with him/her in the meanwhile.

To put it briefly, watch Action Jackson if you are a Prabhudheva or Ajay Devgn fan, because otherwise there isn't a single dialogue you haven't heard and this is one of the films where they say 'Do not take your brains to the theatres'.

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