Enakku Innoru Peru Irukku review: Doesn’t even deserve a single star | movie reviews | Hindustan Times
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Enakku Innoru Peru Irukku review: Doesn’t even deserve a single star

Incredible as it may sound, Sam Anton’s Enakku Innoru Peru Irukku turns its lead actors, Prakash Kumar and Anandhi into mere puppets in a tale of gang wars fought in a north Chennai locality called Royapuram.

movie reviews Updated: Jun 17, 2016 16:45 IST
Gautaman Bhaskaran
Anton’s 130-minute movie turns into a merry-go-round with the images spinning all around it in mindless medley of incidents.
Anton’s 130-minute movie turns into a merry-go-round with the images spinning all around it in mindless medley of incidents.

Enakku Innoru Peru Irukku
Direction: Sam Anton
Cast: G V Prakash Kumar, Anandhi, Saravanan
Rating: 1/5

Incredible as it may sound, Sam Anton’s Enakku Innoru Peru Irukku turns its lead actors, Prakash Kumar and Anandhi into mere puppets in a tale of gang wars fought in a north Chennai locality called Royapuram. In the end, they seem like additional props for a director who appears confused about the kind of priority he wants to give to the romance and the gang wars, which for the most part is buffoonery at its worst. The film gets to be neither, and comes off as a horrible mishmash of events that often seem to have got all mixed up on the editing table.

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Wading through this confusing bunch of frames, the plot in brief is all about an ageing don, Naina (Saravanan), who is out to find a successor. Who can be better to take over his little smuggling empire than a son-in-law. When Naina finds out that his daughter, Hema (Anandhi, a bright actor wasted in an innocuous role), has a lover, Johnny (Kumar), the old man considers himself lucky, not realising that the boy is incapable of drawing blood, the sight of which pushes him into a delirious fit. Into this mess, we have a villainous rival who wants to unseat Naina, and one can well imagine the way it all turns topsy-turvy.

With performances either wooden, like in the case of Kumar or exaggerated from the rest of the cast, Anton’s 130-minute movie turns into a merry-go-round with the images spinning all around it in mindless medley of incidents.

Honestly, I found it difficult to give the film even a single star.

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