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Kakki Sattai review: A silly romp around exotica and evil

Kakki Sattai seems like a work where money has been spent in a mindless pursuit. In times which appear to be giving a fillip to cop stories, Senthilkumar's film meanders through the life of the honest Mathimaran as he takes on evil.

movie reviews Updated: Feb 28, 2015 16:38 IST
Gautaman Bhaskaran
Kakki-Sattai-was-originally-written-for-Dhanush-before-Sivakarthikeyan-replaced-him
Kakki-Sattai-was-originally-written-for-Dhanush-before-Sivakarthikeyan-replaced-him

Kakki Sattai
Direction: Durai Senthilkumar
Cast: Sivakarthikeyan, Prabhu, Sri Divya, Vijay Raaz
Running time: 156 minutes
Rating: 1/5

Once Raj Kapoor took the audience on a world tour in his Around The World and Sangam. Decades later, some Tamil producers and directors (also a few Bollywood mandarins) think that Indian cinema ticket-paying patrons still desire the likes of Kapoor's romps across continents -- romps that can materialise just by sitting on a chair. And, believe it or not, Tamil films transport their heroes and heroines to some of the most exotic locales -- like New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland, Vienna and Italy -- in the wink of an eye. Never mind, the song sequences set in these yonder lands cost a bomb, and worse, stick out like a sore thumb -- neither pushing the plot nor making any meaning at all.

The budget for Durai Senthilkumar's Kakki Sattai (Khaki Uniform) is Rs 10 crores -- an amount that a parallel movie producer may use to spin at least a couple of films, films that will make a lot of sense and entertain in an intelligent way.

Kakki Sattai seems like a work where money has been spent (or sunk) in a mindless pursuit. In times which appear to be giving a fillip to cop stories, Senthilkumar's 156-minute odyssey meanders through the life of Mathimaran (Sivakarthikeyan) -- a lowly constable at a Chennai police station -- whose honesty and lofty idealism clash with the notorious designs of his bosses, including the Police Commissioner of the city.

And a chance to play a good Samaritan comes knocking at Mathimaran's doorstep when he stumbles upon an illegal trade in human organs -- a doubly heinous crime in this case where immigrant workers from West Bengal are murdered and their kidneys, livers and hearts are sold by a cartel, headed by Durai (Vijay Raaz). This man is aided and abetted by the dean of a swanky hospital, the Police Commissioner and a godman of sorts, who acts as a buffoon to fool people. But then Mathimaran has to exhibit his heroism (of course), and with Divya (Sri Divya, essaying an angelic nurse in the hospital) in his arms, he in the true Bond style, conquers all.

Our Bond's exploits are liberally punctuated (they have to, for this is India) by songs and dances that take place not on Chennai roads but in some of the most scenic spots on earth, making one wonder how much of the budget went into this dopey extravaganza. This is not all; there is so much of silliness and tomfoolery that Kakki Sattai begins to hang heavy on time.

And, what is new about the theme? We just saw this recently in Gautham Vasudev Menon's Ajit-starrer, Yennai Arindhaal? Kakki Sattai is just not worth the time or money -- and Sivakarthikeyan known for comedies is a miscast man in uniform.