Mayank Shekhar's Review: Bal Hanuman 2 | movie reviews | Hindustan Times
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Mayank Shekhar's Review: Bal Hanuman 2

This isn't the first of the children’s film on Hanuman. But this is a 3-D film. The story revolves around a boy Hanuman, his father Pavan, the lord of the wind, who is is strangely enough also a monkey God.

movie reviews Updated: May 15, 2010 00:20 IST

HANUMANBal Hanuman 2

Director: Pankaj Sharma

Actors: Animation

Rating: *1/2

James Cameron's Avatar had an eponymous effect on the movies. Pretty much everyone wants to make a 3-D movie now. This isn’t quite the same as making a movie on 3-D. Your eyes can instantly tell the difference between the two.

This is a 3-D film. The screen’s a little fuzzy. The characters merely appear closer than they are; some jut out from the sides of your thick glass. Sometimes, you also see in twos, besides in three dimensions. The crucial fourth dimension is thankfully taken care of: the movie’s less than an hour and half long.

The hero is a boy Hanuman. His father Pavan, the lord of the wind, is strangely enough also a monkey God, like his son. As for a story, I’m still trying hard to recall, perhaps because there was very little of it to speak of.

Little Hanuman stands for protecting the weak, and destroying the devil (Asahay ki madad. Dusht ka vinash): save his little friend, for instance, from elephants gone wild. Through most of the picture though, he pretty much plays the fool. At one point, he pranks out the priests, upsetting them enough to curse him against awareness of his own super-powers. He won’t know of the might vested upon him until he's old enough to handle it judiciously, ordains an angry rishi. This part is in sync with the original text of Ramayan, not with the rest of this film though. Boy Hanuman eventually takes on another beast and flattens him out completely.

This isn't the first of the children’s film on Hanuman. There've been quite a few in the series. This is understandable. Indians have little tradition of storytelling about super-heroes, outside of mythology. Somewhere you can sense, these stories (in this case, of course, there is none) are somehow better told by grandmothers.

The technology vested upon the filmmakers thus could be much better used on gaming instead. A joystick or console devise attached to seats before a huge cinema screen, where you can determine the story of your own super-hero. Now that sounds like a more exciting idea to me.

The cinema I’m at though, I take the glass off, and need another one right away (wishing one with beer this time instead). I hope the kids had a good time. What choice do they have anyway?