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REVIEW: Honeymoon Travels...

Despite a jumbo starcast, Honeymoon Travels Pvt Ltd is just about passable, writes Khalid Mohamed.

movie reviews Updated: Mar 01, 2007 11:16 IST

Honeymoon Travels Pvt Ltd
Cast: Shabana Azmi, Boman Irani, Raima Sen, Kay Kay Menon, Minissha Lamba, Amisha Patel, Abhay Deol, Sandhya Mridul, Vikram Chatwal
Director: Reema Kagti
Rating: **

Buzz off Krrish. To fry new fish, here’s a Superaadmi and Superstree who fly, sigh, and whoa, perform a tango in Goa. Plus, there’s a Kolkata bride whose prissy husband loses his pride when his brain is stir fried. Woe betide.

Question: So, should you go on a ride for Reema Kagti’s Honeymoon Travels Private Ltd? Umm, let’s say don’t kill for a ticket..but for want of a better option, sure..do sample the purported comedy. Gee, it makes you go tee but not hee.

Actually, the device of different stories coalescing is older than Meena Kumari’s salty teardrops (she was one of the many suffering souls in K A Abbas’ Char Dil Char Rahen). Plus you’ve giggled and gargled along with the let’s-canoodle dulhas and dularis in..gasp..Tarachand Barjatya’s Honeymoon (yup, even Rajshri Pictures were non-veggie once).

And of course, you’ve bounced in the boudoirs of Hollywood’s California Suite, years before the sextet here hops on to a Shahed Chand Safar Niji Ltd. Or a hideously pink bus which has video-shideo which no one watches. What grumps!

Okay, so cut back to Krrish dikro and Krrishni dikri (Abhay Deol-Minnisha Lamba, both sweetness personified). O khodai, they’re Parsis.

Believe it or they don’t eat dhansak, and speak in robust rajma chaawal accents. Authenticity is made falooda of..but so what!

Similarly, a Bengali Mr Partho Omighosh (Kay Kay Menon) is about as Kolkata as the Eiffel Tower. Comparatively, his wife (Raima Sen, knocking out the most likeable performance in this bus ride) is more believable and wishes to para-glide. Bhaalo, but then even she breaks into a kickboxing bout. Jokey Chan anyone? Seems she preferred learning karate to Rabindra sangeet. Kya zamaana aa gaya hai, truly.

For more regional-rejigged, Boman Irani is a Catholic (not convincing, at all) who has just married the Muslim Shabana Azmi ( benign and smiley). They’re there to assert that age has nothing to do with remarriages. Wow, what a revelation.

Next: The remaining three couples are as dispensable as the screen time assigned to them. A jilted Jane (Sandhya Mridul, typecast) freaks out on hearing her internet groom is gay (

Bahut Dukhi

Expression).



And last but not the least-challenged, a Delhi chatterbox (Ameesha Patel, enthusiastic) almost eats an enormous cardboard oyster on sensing that her husband (Anonymous Type), too is semi-gay. Hey, why didn’t they just make a block booking for Brokeback Mountain?

Does that leave out any..yawn? Hmm, yeah dear old Ranvir Shorey, a Gujarati bhai whose wife runs away with a Mr Mobike. Arjun Rampal and Dia Mirza are the bike lovers who dhoom off to hide in a wondrous log cabin till someone puts a “supari without a paan” on them. That’s the kind of dialogue you catch in this honeymooner in which too many cuckoos spoil the broth. Bus karo really.

If you don’t come tearing out your hair by its roots, it’s essentially because of the marvellously choreographed and performed tango by the Supercouple and that emotionally insightful moment when the unflappable Ms Azmi (backless, hai rabba) dissolves into tears under the shower.

On the techfront, the effort’s just about passable. The script unnecessarily tags on a voice-over by a radio jockey.The past of some of the characters is defined, others hang in a limbo.

As for the direction, it is so drastically earnest that you often want to shake up Ms Katgi and tell her to have some feni and games.

Sadly, she doesn’t. So you leave Hornymoon with just about a quarter of a smile on your face..as you would on receiving a handshake instead of a hug.