Review: The Simpsons Movie | movie reviews | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 24, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Review: The Simpsons Movie

The Simpsons Movie manages to settle in that tested comic groove that has forever worked for the series. That itself makes it worth a watch, writes Vinayak Chakrovorty.

movie reviews Updated: Aug 17, 2007 19:09 IST

The Simpsons Movie
Voices:
Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright
Direction: David Silverman
Rating: * * * & 1/2 (three and half stars)

The good news: it’s exactly all that you expected — cute, funny, irreverent and very contemporary in an American sort of way. The bad news: it’s exactly all that you expected — in effect, The Simpsons Movie seems like a fullblown, one-and-half hour episode of all that the world has seen on telly over the past 17 years.

America’s first toon family has always sassed it up by turning the routine into something special, with that hallmark potty flair. Here, as Bart Simpson in the buff skateboards in a hilarious sequence that should be the ultimate tribute to Austin Powers, you realise the formula is working very well, all over again.

In The Movie, Homer Simpson pollutes the lake in hometown Springfield, drawing the fury of the townsfolk and the government. The typical political jibe is in-your-face — President Schwarzenegger orders the town to be terminated, and Homer and family must act as saviours before it is too late.

For a film with an 11-member screenplay crew (plus four ‘consultant writers’ — surely some record for Hollywood, this), The Simpsons Movie doesn’t have much of a script.

Filmmaker David Silverman (who directed several episodes of the TV series, apart from the superb toon flick Monsters, Inc.) makes up for as much by serving the socio-political digs with a dash of cheeky wit.

The Simpsons Movie manages to settle in that tested comic groove that has forever worked for the series. That itself makes it worth a watch. In a word, it all boils down to toddler Maggie’s first word as the end credits roll: “Sequel?” Yeah, I guess.