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Review: Wafaa

Any Aradhana, Amar Prem, Kati Patang nostalgia can be put away in the attic trunk, as the new and not-improved Rajesh Khanna makes a comeback with Wafaa, writes Anand Singh.

movie reviews Updated: Dec 19, 2008 19:19 IST
Anand Singh

Wafaa


Direction:

Rakesh Sawant


Cast:

Rajesh Khanna, Laila Khan, Tinu Anand, Sudesh Berry


Rating:

*



If memory serves right, in his 'superstar' heyday, Rajesh Khanna did not take his shirt off, like today's studs routinely do.



So it is a shock to see the star in his seventies, bare his hairy chest and fleshy back — he belongs to the age when the gym was not the star's second home and men did not wax their bodies — and do the kind of sleazy scenes he never did in his youth.



Rakesh Sawant (reportedly Rakhi Sawant's brother) will break many a female heart, that throbbed for the superstar of the seventies, and any

Aradhana

,

Amar Prem, Kati Patang

nostalgia can be put away in the attic trunk, as the new and not-improved Rajesh Khanna makes a comeback with

Wafaa

.



The film is tacky beyond belief — just the sets are enough to put anyone off their lunch.. add to that Khanna's supporting cast, a tartily outfitted Laila Khan as Beena, his sexually frustrated wife, and unknowns as her lover, sister-in-law and her boyfriend, plus a fetched out of cold storage Sudesh Berry and Tinu Anand — and

Wafaa

can be counted among the worst films of the year (maybe of all time).



The plot is borrowed from

Chase a Crooked Shadow

, already done in Hindi as

Dhuan

(1981), with minor variations. In

Postman Always Rings Twice

and

Jism

fashion, Beena hooks up with her lover, the family chauffeur, to bump off the rich husband Amrit (Khanna), who has an asthma attack every time she wear flimsy nighties and gets into bed.



The husband turns up very much alive and the cops (Tinu Anand, Sudesh Berry) can't find any proof of his being an imposter, as Beena and driver get increasingly desperate because they can't get their hands on the mansion with the chandeliers, fountains, plastic flowers and parrot cage.



Terribly shot, with tinny music and dreadful performances,

Wafaa

is as dated as the brass rotary phone and globe atlas props. Not to mention a creaky superstar, who ought to have had better sense than to sign this film and take his shirt off?