1,700 students from 86 Mumbai colleges won’t be allowed to give HSC exams in 2018 | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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1,700 students from 86 Mumbai colleges won’t be allowed to give HSC exams in 2018

Mumbai city news: As per education department, these students were admitted through offline admissions process, which is in violation of Maharashtra government’s policy

mumbai Updated: Jun 13, 2017 00:30 IST
Puja Pednekar
Offline admissions are considered illegal, as all seats in the FYJC sections are supposed to be filled via centralised online a admission process, conducted by the department between March and September 2016.
Offline admissions are considered illegal, as all seats in the FYJC sections are supposed to be filled via centralised online a admission process, conducted by the department between March and September 2016. (Representational photo )

Close to 1,700 students will be barred from appearing for Higher Secondary Certificate (HSC) exams next year. The state education department issued notices to 86 colleges for admitting students in 2016 by violating the online admission process.  

The list includes reputable colleges such as KC College, Churchgate, St Andrew’s, Bandra, RD National, Bandra, KJ Somaiya College of Arts and Commerce, Vidyavihar and Anjuman-i-Islam Junior College, CST . The highest number of illegal admissions (454 in science stream) were reported from Ajit Pawar College, Borivli, which was shut by the department of late.  

A third-party audit of the first year junior college (FYJC) admission process 2016-17 by the department revealed that more than 771 students were admitted in commerce, 726 in science, and 206 in arts streams across Mumbai and Thane. The students were admitted offline.  

Offline admissions are considered illegal, as all seats in the FYJC sections are supposed to be filled via centralised online admission process, conducted by the department between March and September 2016. “While all the colleges were expected to conduct their admissions on merit-basis and in a transparent manner, the identified colleges carried out offline admissions. They violated the Maharashtra government’s orders,” reads the notice issued by BB Chavan, deputy director of education, Mumbai region.  

The notice states that students will not be allowed to appear for HSC exams and college managements must initiate an inquiry against principal and heads for permitting offline admissions.  

Officials said explanations offered by the colleges for violating the norms were unsatisfactory.

“We do not want to put students at risk, but these are serious offences and will be considered as contempt of court. The Bombay high court had ordered all admissions to be done online ,” said Chavan.  

In their defence, colleges blamed clerical errors and changing of streams by students for the alleged violation.

“We were allotted students online, but we switched their streams on humanitarian grounds,” said Pratibha Gaddagali , vice-principal, Bunts Sangh’s SM Shetty Junior College, Powai, which admitted six students offline. “One student was allotted a science seat online, despite failing in math, and others were moved to commerce as they found science tough.”  

Other colleges said it was a clerical error. “We are accused of two offline admissions. It was an oversight. We have apologized to the department,” said Marie Fernandes, principal, St Andrew’s. 

She complained that the flawed online admission process is equally responsible for these mistakes. “Last year, the online admissions stretched for over three to four months. The department conducted too many rounds, confusing our staff.”  

Similarly, Sudha Vyas, principal, KJ Somaiya, said, “The offline admissions were a result of a typing error by the college staff. We have already replied to the notice.”