How kidney transplant by robot gave Mumbai man a new lease of life | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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How kidney transplant by robot gave Mumbai man a new lease of life

Mumbai city news: The benefits of this kind of transplant are less risk of infection, less pain, faster recovery and finer scaled movements of robotic instruments.

mumbai Updated: Jul 12, 2017 11:00 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
CN Murlidharan after the surgery at the hospital.
CN Murlidharan after the surgery at the hospital.(HT)

Mumbai resident CN Murlidharan became the first person in Maharashtra to undergo a robotic kidney transplant.

Doctors from Sir HN Reliance Foundation Hospital and Research Centre (HNRF), the fourth center in the country to perform the surgery, said robotic technology offers lower risk of infection and pain and faster recovery.

Murlidharan, 59, received a kidney donated by his wife Neena on July 2. “The family agreed to opt for the surgery over conventional method after we told them that it has greater precision over vascular anatomy owing to higher magnification and finer scaled movements of robotic instruments,” said Dr Inderbir Gill, head of department, urology and robotics.

Murlidharan had been on dialysis for the past one-and-a-half years. “I decided to give up my kidney for my husband’s normal life,” said Leena.

Explaining the surgery, doctors said the donor kidney is removed laparoscopically, which ensures faster recovery than open surgery. The transplant then takes place with the help of a small incision, similar to a donor retrieval incision, and no muscles are cut. The Da Vinci robot, developed by an American company, is then used through keyhole incisions to graft kidney vessels to the patient’s blood vessels, using microvascular instruments and sutures.

“The 360 degree movement of robotic arms and suturing with fine tremor-free movements of robotic instruments helps the patient recover faster. Since the incision is not over the site of the graft kidney, chances of infection are negligible,” Dr Gill added.

Murlidharan said the robotic surgery was not very painful either. “I was initially reluctant but the doctors convinced me about the benefits. I am happy that I went ahead with it,” he said.