Admissions for teaching courses face roadblocks | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Admissions for teaching courses face roadblocks

Till last year, students were admitted to private BEd colleges on basis of their scores in a separate CET that was conducted by Maharashtra Vinaanudanit Mahavidyalaya Sansthachalk Association (MVMSA).

mumbai Updated: Aug 24, 2016 14:01 IST
Musab Qazi
While the state has been conducting the Centralised Admission Process for the government and aided teaching colleges though a Common Entrance Test (CET), private teaching colleges were also included in the process this year.
While the state has been conducting the Centralised Admission Process for the government and aided teaching colleges though a Common Entrance Test (CET), private teaching colleges were also included in the process this year.((Sunil Ghosh / HT file))

The admissions for teaching courses, namely BEd, MEd, BPEd (Bachelor of Physical Education) and MPEd (Master of Physical Education), faced the same roadblocks as law courses.

While the state has been conducting the Centralised Admission Process for the government and aided teaching colleges though a Common Entrance Test (CET), private teaching colleges were also included in the process this year. Till last year, students were admitted to private BEd colleges on basis of their scores in a separate CET that was conducted by Maharashtra Vinaanudanit Mahavidyalaya Sansthachalk Association (MVMSA) - an umbrella body of unaided BEd colleges.

The first hurdle to the admission process came in the form of MVMSA, which moved the Bombay High Court against the government order, arguing that the state has no right to take over the admission process in private colleges. According to an official at the state CET Cell the private colleges, hoping for a favourable outcome in the case, caused confusion among students by telling them that there will be another entrance examination. The state then had to extend the deadline to apply for CET.

MVMSA said that students were not aware about the government decision to have a single CET for all the colleges. “They assumed that there will be another CET conducted by the association. Many students wanted to apply after the registration process was over. Now, the government should allow colleges to admit students who didn’t appear for the CET,” said Ramzan Shaikh, secretary, MVMSA.

Also, like the law colleges the process of getting approvals from the apex body of colleges -National Council for Teachers Education, in case of teaching colleges - also delayed the admissions.