Coffee has no positive impact on physical or mental ailments: Study | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Coffee has no positive impact on physical or mental ailments: Study

Multiple short-term trials conducted by the researchers suggested that coffee has a neutral effect on most glycemic (particular type of food that indicates the food’s effect on a person’s blood glucose) traits, but raises fatty acids.

mumbai Updated: Nov 17, 2016 16:28 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
Mumbai

The study pointed out that India is one of the largest coffee consuming markets along with China and Korea.(HT FILE PHOTO )

Coffee has no positive impact on physical or mental ailments, said psychiatrists from the city, citing an international study published jointly by universities in China and the US. The study, published in the scientific journal, Nature, analysed the impact of habituated coffee consumption on type-2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease, depression and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study pointed out that India is one of the largest coffee consuming markets along with China and Korea. Over the past decade, these Asian countries have surpassed western countries in terms of coffee consumption, said researchers.

The researchers, Man Ki Kwok and Gabriel M Leung from School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong and C Mary Schooling, City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy had conducted multiple medical trials.

“To clarify the impact of coffee consumption and its allegedly observed effects, we compared type-2 D diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart ailments and its risk factors by genetically predicted coffee consumption using large extensively genotyped case-control and cross-sectional studies,” said the researchers.

The multiple short-term trials suggested that coffee has a neutral effect on most glycemic (particular type of food that indicates the food’s effect on a person’s blood glucose) traits, but raises fatty acids.

The analyses of these randomised controlled trials (RCTs) suggested short-term coffee consumption also raises low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

“Several RCTs showed that short-term coffee consumption had no effect on fasting glucose, fasting insulin or insulin resistance although it slightly increased haemoglobin levels. Lack of evidence from long-term RCTs indicates that the effects of coffee on health are unclear,” said researchers.

The researchers, however, found that coffee consumption might increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other mental disorders rather than acting as a suppressant.

Dr Sagar Mundada, MD psychiatry, KEM Hospital, Parel, said that the results of all the trials and its connection are path breaking. “Coffee is considered to be a brain stimulant that can help against depression, forgetfulness and low moods and so, many people consume it in large quantities. However, this study claims that coffee provides no such additional benefit or protection against depression or Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, excess coffee consumption can lead to caffeine use disorder,” he said.

Another psychiatrist said that the commercialisation of coffee has had a direct impact on its consumption. “The study suggests many outcomes based on scientific studies conducted on the after-effects of long-term coffee consumption. But at the same time, seeing the immense popularity coffee has achieved over the years, it’s almost impossible to prevent people from consuming it,” he said.