Conjoined twins with two heads and one torso die a day after birth in Maharashtra | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Conjoined twins with two heads and one torso die a day after birth in Maharashtra

Doctors said the parents are daily wage farm labourers and didn’t have enough money to access medical facilities that could have helped diagnose the condition in time using radiological tests

mumbai Updated: Nov 03, 2017 00:32 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
Doctors said the twins were born on October 29 and died of respiratory disorder.
Doctors said the twins were born on October 29 and died of respiratory disorder.(HT)

Conjoined twins, born at Government Medical College (GMC) of Ambajogai on Sunday, died owing to respiratory disorder within 24 hours. Doctors said this is the third case of babies being born with dicephalic parapagus (two heads one torso) in the state ever. 

Doctors from Ambajogai said the twins, born on October 29 at 9.30pm, were diagnosed with birth asphyxia (deprivation of oxygen) and respiratory complications. “The twins weighed 3.7kg at birth and had separate lungs and brain but shared other integral organs. The incident itself is one in one lakh childbirths and only one third of such babies survive,” said Dr Sudhir Deshmukh, dean of Ambajogai GMC. 

Doctors said the children died on Monday afternoon owing to respiratory failure and pulmonary hypoplasia (underdeveloped organ). “We had put the twins in the ventilator right after their birth because their lungs were underdeveloped and one of them was diagnosed with anencephaly (life threatening brain and skull underdevelopment). There were other anomalies too that restricted their chances of survival,” said doctors from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the hospital. 

READ: Twins Riddhi and Siddhi, who were once conjoined, celebrate 4th birthday in Mumbai hospital

Dr Deshmukh added that the parents, who already have one son and three daughters, are daily wage farm labourers and didn’t have enough money to access medical facilities that could have helped diagnose the condition in time using radiological tests. “The condition of the children was diagnosed only in the seventh month of gestation. By then the woman had passed the legal stage of abortion,” he added.

In most of such cases, delay in diagnosis results in families having to go through the trouble of witnessing the death of the children, said doctors. “Similar issue had taken place in the case of Mumbai’s conjoined twins who passed away four months after their birth. Moreover, since the condition isn’t life threatening to the mother, MTP (Medical Termination of Pregnancy) Act isn’t likely to allow abortion after the legal limit of 20 weeks of gestation,” said Dr Paras Kothari, head of paediatrics department at Sion Hospital. 

Doctors said most of these children have a still born delivery and timely radiological intervention is the only way to diagnose the condition well before 20 weeks of gestation.