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Dental colleges seek extension in admission deadline

mumbai Updated: Oct 18, 2016 00:58 IST
Musab Qazi
Musab Qazi
Hindustan Times
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Students coming out after taking the All India Pre Medical Test at the Kerala School in New Delhi. The SC had allowed deemed medical and dental institutes to conduct admissions till October 7. (HT PHOTO FOR REPRESENTATION )

Two weeks after the Supreme Court (SC) rejected a plea by the state’s Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) to extend the admission date to October 7 for all government-run and private medical and dental institutes in Maharashtra, private dental colleges, whose seats are left vacant, want Dental Council of India (DCI) and the Centre to again move the court and seek an extension.

Although Dr Dibyendu Mazumdar, president, DCI, said he hasn’t received any communication from colleges, Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER, and Kamal Kishore Kadam, president, Association of Management of Unaided Private Medical and Dental Colleges, have confirmed that some colleges have written to the DCI and the Centre to intervene.

Read: Deemed medical colleges to take autonomy battle to SC

Despite insistence from colleges, Mazumdar said that the DCI has no plans of moving SC. “The state is responsible for admissions, not us. Why would we move court?” he said.

The SC had allowed deemed medical and dental institutes to conduct admissions till October 7. However, all government and private institutes had to finish the procedure before midnight of September 30, as per the SC’s April order. While the state government was able to fill all the seats in its dental colleges and all but six seats in its medical colleges, several seats in private dental colleges are still vacant.

“The students prefer the medical course (MBBS) over the dental one (BDS). Many students who were admitted to dental colleges, switched to medical colleges when they got an opportunity,” said Kadam.

He, however, added that some these students were stuck with the dental colleges, as the colleges, who were unsure about filling vacancies at the last moment, demanded the fees of entire four-year BDS course from the students who wished to cancel their admissions.