Eating out to become costlier if govt decides to regulate food portions, say Mumbai hoteliers | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Eating out to become costlier if govt decides to regulate food portions, say Mumbai hoteliers

Should the Centre decide to regularise food portion served by star hotels and restaurants, eating out will become costlier, say hoteliers in Mumbai,adding that one size does not fit all.

mumbai Updated: Apr 12, 2017 11:48 IST
Naresh Kamath
Mumbai

The Union food ministry is drafting a questionnaire for hotels and restaurants to explain what dish sizes they should serve to a customer.

Should the Centre decide to regularise food portion served by star hotels and restaurants, eating out will become costlier, say hoteliers in Mumbai,adding that one size does not fit all.

According to Kamlesh Barot, Director, Vie Hospitality, which runs the Revival Group of Hotels, prices will shoot up with such regulations. “We will be forced to increase rates as it will interfere with our business model. Our pricing and food portions are planned accordingly and any interference will have a direct effect on the consumer’s bill,” Barot fears.

“Currently, it is unfeasible to increase costs and many establishments will be forced to close down,” he adds.

Satish Nayak, who owns the reputed Idli House and Udupi Sri Krishna Boarding at Matunga, second Barot.

“We design the entire menu and the portion size based on variety of things such as the demography of the area and taste of the people. Standardization will complicate things,” obsereves Nayak.

The Union food ministry is drafting a questionnaire for hotels and restaurants to explain what dish sizes they should serve to a customer. According to Food minister Ram Vilas Paswan, the aim is to reduce food wastage in these establishments. He said the hoteliers were the best people to suggest the dish sizes.

The Hotels and Restaurant Association of Western India (HRAWI) has debunked the wastage theory, saying that consumers are smart enough not to waste. “Many of the customers take the parcel home of unfinished food. In addition, many of the hotels have tied up with NGOs who supply the leftovers to the poor,” said Dilip Datwani, president, HRAWI.

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Hoteliers against Centre fixing portion size