Five arrested with 44 illegal internet calling machines in Mumbai | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Five arrested with 44 illegal internet calling machines in Mumbai

One of the accused ran the racket under the garb of a cable TV business.

mumbai Updated: Aug 08, 2017 23:16 IST
Jayprakash S Naidu
The seizures were made from eight places in Shivaji Nagar and Mankhurd areas.
The seizures were made from eight places in Shivaji Nagar and Mankhurd areas. (Pic for Representation)

The Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS), Crime Investigation Unit (CIU) and Mumbai Crime Branch arrested five men and seized 44 machines used to receive illegal internet calls from the Middle East. The department of telecommunications has incurred a loss of Rs49 crore owing to three of these machines. Assessment for other machines is underway.

The accused — Mohammad Nazim Khan, 27, Shams Shaikh, 34, Shahid Jamal, 36, Noor Mohammad Shaikh, 35 and Nassir Hussain 30 — were arrested on August 3 and 4. The seizures were made from eight places in Shivaji Nagar and Mankhurd areas. Two servers were also seized. These machines were smuggled into India from China by cargo while being shown as sound amplifiers. Nazim, an HSC drop out, had visited China to receive training to use the equipment. “Several internet calls were received with these machines from the Middle East. The ones making these calls got the service at the rate of local calls. They were given phone cards for it. The accused also made a mobile application called “Dial to India” for these calls,” said PI Ajay Sawant, head of Crime Branch unit-V.

One of the accused ran the racket under the garb of a cable TV business.

“Till now phone calls received in four months on three machines incurred losses of Rs 49 crore. The assessment of remaining 41 machines for the past 18 months is underway. The final figure of losses incurred will be quite big,” said another CB official.

Inspector Yogesh Chavan said, “The accused leased a server from a UK company. The calls came to the SIM boxes in Mumbai and were redirected on to normal phones in India. The government agencies could neither track nor monitor these calls.”