Former housing secretary is Maharashtra’s RERA chief | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Former housing secretary is Maharashtra’s RERA chief

MUMBAI CITY NEWS: Gautam Chatterjee, who is an authority in urban housing, was serving as interim chairman of the authority and played a vital role in framing the housing rules in the state.

mumbai Updated: May 24, 2017 00:12 IST
Naresh R Kamath
Since the RERA came into effect on May 1, 11 builders have registered their projects while 500 brokers have shared their details with the authority.
Since the RERA came into effect on May 1, 11 builders have registered their projects while 500 brokers have shared their details with the authority.(HT)

Retired bureaucrat Gautam Chatterjee was on Tuesday appointed as chairman of the Maharashtra Real Estate Regulatory Authority, which implements the Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Act (RERA).

Chatterjee, who is an authority in urban housing, was serving as interim chairman of the authority and played a vital role in framing the housing rules in the state.

Since the RERA came into effect on May 1, 11 builders have registered their projects while 500 brokers have shared their details with the authority.

According to Chatterjee, his own aim is to make the system favourable to the buyer.

“RERA will ensure that builders give the buyer whatever product he has promised,” said Chatterjee.

Under the Act, all builders have to register their projects within 60 days from the day it came into effect.

In the past, Chatterjee headed the Slum Rehabilitation Authority (SRA), Maharashtra Housing and Area Development Authority (MHADA), Dharavi Redevelopment Authority (DRA) and was also a housing secretary.

The Act mandates that developers must provide all details of their projects on a website, register their flats after a certain number are booked and deposit the money collected from buyers in a dedicated account.

Developers have also been barred from discriminating among buyers based on caste, creed, religion, food habits and language.