From Quit India to petty crimes: Iconic south Mumbai police station turns 100 | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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From Quit India to petty crimes: Iconic south Mumbai police station turns 100

The officials posted at the police station, which was established in 1917 at Grant Road (East), now are tracing information and people who were associated with its long standing history.

mumbai Updated: Oct 02, 2017 10:13 IST
Jayprakash S Naidu
Gamdevi police station was one of the most important police stations during the pre-independence period
Gamdevi police station was one of the most important police stations during the pre-independence period(HT Photo)

The Gamdevi police station in south Mumbai completes 100 years this year. Right from the Quit India movement to several recent cases of theft and murder, the police station has seen it all.

The officials posted at the police station, which was established in 1917 at Grant Road (East), now are tracing information and people who were associated with its long standing history.

“We are trying to track some of the revolutionaries who had been imprisoned in our lock up during the independence struggle,” said an official. They plan to host a function at the station premises to celebrate the historic movement.

The Gamdevi police station was one of the most important stations during the pre-independence period, because senior imperial officers of the British era lived in their jurisdiction which covered the Malabar hill area and Chowpatty.

Currently, the areas under the jurisdiction of Gamdevi police station include Bandstand, Grant Road Railway station, the area around Breach Candy and the Altamount Road area - all of which are considered to be up market SoBo.

The historic Mani Bhavan, which was the focal point of Mahatma Gandhi’s political activities, is barely a 100 meters away from the station.

The officials of Gamdevi police station were part of the force that had lathi charged and used tear gas on the revolutionaries at August Kranti Maidan , where Gandhi had delivered the Quit India speech in August 1942.

Historian Deepak Rao, 68, said, “As part of the Police Accommodation Scheme for modern Bombay 1909, the station was among the first police stations to have accommodation for its men behind the police station, so that in case of an emergency, officials can reach the station quickly.”