Protests, the Govinda way: Horizontal pyramids, ladders to break handis | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 17, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Protests, the Govinda way: Horizontal pyramids, ladders to break handis

The Kokannagar Govinda Pathak was the first to form a horzontal pyramid on the road around 10 am at Dadar.

mumbai Updated: Aug 25, 2016 14:49 IST
Kunal Patil
The Kokannagar Govinda Pathak was the first to form a sleeping pyramid on the road around 10 am at Dadar.
The Kokannagar Govinda Pathak was the first to form a sleeping pyramid on the road around 10 am at Dadar. (KUNAL PATIL)

Govinda groups across Mumbai followed the Supreme Court’s guidelines on the height and age cap while building their pyramids. But while they stuck to their tradition, they made sure they made their protest known.

One group at Dadar, the Kokannagar Govinda Pathak, was the first to form a horizontal pyramid on the road ; they later used a ladder to break the handi. Another mandal near Dadar also lowered the height of the handi.

Three other mandals waved black flags to express their disappointment.

Dahi handi is an annual tradition, observed during the festival of Gokulashtami in India. Women, men and children form human pyramids to reach a pot filled with curd tied several feet high. This event is based on the legend of the child-god Krishna stealing butter.

Until 2014, the tradition drew big money prizes from organisers and political parties.in August that year, acting on a petition, the Bombay HC put curbs on the height of the pyramid and the age of participants - at 20 feet and 18 years. In November the same year, the Supreme Court upheld the HC order.

The celebrations have since been subdued, even as political parties and groups have protested against the decision.

The Mumbai and Thane police are using video cameras and decibel metres to record offences. Massive security has been deployed across the city to ensure the SC guidelines are not violated. There are around 4,000 small and big dahi handi organisers in the city, with some 1,000 considered big players.