Govt plans to create new ITI divisions to use unutilised machinery | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Govt plans to create new ITI divisions to use unutilised machinery

In the last five to seven years, 5,612 government ITI divisions were closed due to a variety of reasons. A

mumbai Updated: Nov 06, 2016 00:42 IST
Directorate General of Training

In its report, the panel appointed in December 2014 and headed by the director of the state’s Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) Subhash Mahajan, has recommended creating new divisions of courses which are in demand. (Representational photo)

With over 50,000 machinery gathering dust at Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) across the state, a government panel has drawn a plan to create new divisions where these machines can be transferred.

In the last five to seven years, 5,612 government ITI divisions were closed due to a variety of reasons. Also, 1,441 divisions approved by the state are yet to take off for the want of affiliation from Directorate General of Training (DGT). The equipment purchased for these courses are now gathering dust in ITIs.

In its report, the panel appointed in December 2014 and headed by the director of the state’s Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) Subhash Mahajan, has recommended creating new divisions of courses which are in demand. The machines would then be transferred to those divisions, suggested Mahajan. The committee has identified electrician, fitter, diesel mechanic, turner and draughtsman as trades that are in high demand. On the other hand, the ones like basic cosmetology, sheet metal worker and tractor mechanic are less popular.

“The committee has recommended moving the machinery belonging to the obsolete courses to the relevant ones. For example, some, if not all, of the machines used by welders can also be used by fitters,” said an official.

The report has suggested that the machinery from an ITI must preferably be used in the same institute by creating new divisions for existing courses. The additional equipment could be moved to other ITIs in the same district. The equipment bought from money appropriated under a particular scheme — tribal subplan, public private partnership or the World Bank project - should be transferred to a course started under the same scheme, the report suggested.

In order to avoid wastage of resources in the future, the panel has also suggested precautionary measures while starting new skill development programmes and purchasing equipment.

The panel’s report insisted that the government create teaching posts before providing basic facilities and purchasing equipment for new courses. “In case of unaffiliated ITI divisions, the Directorate of Vocational Education and Training (DVET) purchased the machinery even before the teaching posts were created. With the government refusing to create new posts, for the want of funds, DGT refused to grant affiliation to the divisions. As a result the machinery purchased is lying unutilised,” said the official.

Why are so many machines lying idle in ITIs?

- Directorate General of Training (DGT) decided to shut down the Centre of Excellence scheme, which was implemented in 174 government ITIs across the state.

- DGT also derecognised six-month vocational training courses, in addition to 20 other courses

- Many ITI divisions didn’t receive DGT’s affiliation, as the state government failed to create teaching posts for them

- Machineries were purchased for divisions which weren’t approved by the state government

- Many divisions were closed after the state decided to discontinue second and third shifts at ITIs

How does the government plan to utilise them?

The state government, in 2014, constituted a committee under Subhash Mahajan, director, Directorate of Technical Education (DTE), to suggest ways to transfer the equipment. Here are the panel’s recommendations:

- The state should create new divisions of the courses which are in demand and utilise the idle machinery for them.

- The machinery from an ITI should preferably be utilised within the same institute. The remainder equipment could be moved to other ITIs within the district.

- The equipment bought from money appropriated under a particular scheme should be transferred to a course started under the same scheme.

- ITIs should sign memoranda of understanding (MoUs) with industries to start short-term Vocational Training Programmes (VTPs).

What precautionary measures were recommended by the panel for future expansion?

- The demographics of an area must be taken into account before approving new institutes. The ratio ITI seats to the students passing class 10 exam in an area can be 1:16.

- An ITI must consist of at least eight divisions, on order to make optimum utilisation of resources.

- The government must be assured of usefulness, relevance and outcome of a project, before it’s implemented.

- Any new project must be first implemented on pilot basis, before launching it on large scale.

- The government should create teaching posts before providing basic facilities and purchasing equipment for new courses.

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