HC pulls up bar councils for halting law admissions | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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HC pulls up bar councils for halting law admissions

The Bombay high court on Thursday issued notices to the Bar Council of India (BCI) and the Bar Council of Maharashtra and Goa, following a public interest litigation complaining about abrupt stopping of admission to law courses in almost all the colleges across the state.

mumbai Updated: Sep 08, 2016 23:53 IST
Kanchan Chaudhari
Terming the action of BCI a “gross misuse and abuse of power”, the PIL stated that the BCI has stopped  admissions to most colleges in Maharashtra primarily because of non-payment of annual inspection fee of Rs1.50 lakh per course.
Terming the action of BCI a “gross misuse and abuse of power”, the PIL stated that the BCI has stopped admissions to most colleges in Maharashtra primarily because of non-payment of annual inspection fee of Rs1.50 lakh per course.(HT File Photo)

The Bombay high court on Thursday issued notices to the Bar Council of India (BCI) and the Bar Council of Maharashtra and Goa and asked them to appear to explain an abrupt halt in the admissions to law colleges across the state.

Acting on a public interest litigation filed by seven students on the discontinuation of laws admissions in the state, a division bench of Chief Justice Manjula Chellur and Justice MS Sonak posted the matter for further hearing on September 14, 2016. 

The counsel for the petitioner students, IA Sayed, on Thursday pointed out that though half of the semester is over, the admissions have not yet started in most of the law colleges in Maharashtra. He further pointed out that the Bar Council of India, which has abruptly halted admissions to law colleges in the state, had no power or authority to interfere with admission process.

Terming the action of BCI, which regulates law education in the country, as “gross misuse and abuse of power”, the PIL stated that the BCI has stopped admissions to most colleges in Maharashtra primarily because of non-payment of annual inspection fee of Rs1.50 lakh per course. 

The petitioner students have questioned the levy of such hefty fees by the BCI on law colleges, contending that the regulating body has imposed the fees without carrying out any inspection, and ultimately students are bearing the brunt.

Besides, the PIL also brought to the notice of the court that according to rules, in every semester minimum 90 days of teaching must be completed, but since this year admissions are delayed by over two months, it is not possible for teaching staff to fulfill this requirement, apart from the fact that the students will also find it difficult to complete the study and prepare for the first semester examination, which is usually taken in the month of October.