Kurla-Mulund rail stretch the deadliest in Mumbai: Survey | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Kurla-Mulund rail stretch the deadliest in Mumbai: Survey

The suburban railway stretch from Kurla to Mulund is the most accident prone in Mumbai, according to the statistics collated by Praja Foundation

mumbai Updated: Nov 16, 2016 00:37 IST
Saurabh M Joshi
Mumbai

The railway police stated that there are many other reasons apart from rise in number of passengers behind railway accidental deaths.(HT File Photo)

The suburban railway stretch from Kurla to Mulund is the most accident prone in Mumbai, according to the statistics collated by Praja Foundation with 26% (405) of the total accidental deaths (1,585) in 2015. The same patch also had 18% (333) of the total victims getting seriously injured.

A total of 1,897 people survived railway accidents in 2015, stated the preliminary data revealed by the NGO. The study, however, did not talk about reasons behind the accidents, which, on an average kill at least 11 people everyday and leave equal or more number of people injured. “Several factors played important roles in commuter deaths. We will try to incorporate a wholesome picture from next year,” said Priyanka Sharma from Praja Foundation.

The data revealed a steady rise in the number of accidents in the local suburban section that is spread out on three different lines — Central, Harbour and Western. The section has 17 railway police stations, among which nine police stations falling in municipal limits of Mumbai were covered in the study.

Meanwhile, the railway police stated that there are many other reasons apart from rise in number of passengers behind railway accidental deaths. The most common one being illegally crossing of the tracks. “Most of the deaths take place since people venture on railway lines to take short-cuts. The Kurla-Mulund stretch has several slum pockets too with ruptured side walls from where people enter the railway tracks. Other reasons include falling from crowded trains, falling in the gaps between platforms and footboards etc,” said a GRP officer.

The railways and the police conducted a joint survey in the end of 2015 identifying around 100 chronic accident spots. These spots and stretches are now being secured by repairing side walls, or improving infrastructure like putting up a foot over bridge. Police personnel are also deployed at some of these places to discourage people from crossing the tracks and risking their lives.