Maharashtra govt moves SC against HC for staying GR on domicile quota | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Maharashtra govt moves SC against HC for staying GR on domicile quota

“We have filed a petition against the HC’s stay on the state’s GR. As of now, this will only affect postgraduate medical and dental admissions but we wish to implement similar rules for undergraduate admissions too,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER.

mumbai Updated: May 18, 2017 09:48 IST
Shreya Bhandary
domicile quota

Two days after the Bombay high court (HC) called a special hearing on a Sunday and stayed the government resolution (GR) reserving 67.5% postgraduate (PG) seats to students domiciled in Maharashtra, the state filed a petition in the Supreme Court (SC) challenging the stay. (HT file photo)

The dispute over reservations in medical and dental colleges for students domiciled in Maharashtra is far from over. Two days after the Bombay high court (HC) called a special hearing on a Sunday and stayed the government resolution (GR) reserving 67.5% postgraduate (PG) seats to students domiciled in Maharashtra, the state filed a petition in the Supreme Court (SC) challenging the stay. Officials from Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) were in Delhi on Tuesday.

“We have filed a petition against the HC’s stay on the state’s GR. As of now, this will only affect postgraduate medical and dental admissions but we wish to implement similar rules for undergraduate admissions too,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER. He added that the SC would hearing the petition on May 5.

“This [requirement of a domicile certificate] will be a great for students of Maharashtra. Since the introduction of National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET), our students are worried about losing out to those from the central boards,” said the parent of a medical aspirant from Mumbai.

States such as Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka have the highest number of medical and dental institutes as well as seats in the country and are sought after by aspirants from across India . While parents are happy about state government challenging HC’s decision, they are worried this might close doors to admissions to institutes in other states.

“We have to pick our fights well this time because we don’t want another year of unwarranted court cases between the government and the institutes. Our children will be at the receiving end sufferers if admissions gets delayed like last year,” said another parent.

While the current petition is only applicable for PG admissions, a source from the medical education department said they are currently working on releasing another GR to highlight the state’s decision to introduce similar domicile quota for undergraduate medical and dental admissions too.

Details of the government resolution

On April 27, the medical education department issued a GR stating the state’s decision to reserve 67.5% of the seats in private institutes and 50% seats in deemed institutes for candidates with state domicile. It also stated that for the first time, 25% of the seats in deemed medical and dental universities will now be reserved for candidates from the Scheduled Caste (SC), Scheduled Tribe (ST), Vimukta Jati, Nomadic Tribes (VJNT) and Other Backward Classes (OBC). There’s no quota for students with state domicile in NRI seats.

Other petitions regarding medical admissions filed in court this year:

*Deemed medical and private colleges in the state had filed a petition in the Bombay high court, seeking exemption from state government conducted common admission process (CAP). They had sought the right to conduct their separate process based on NEET scores. This petition was disposed by HC in April

*Deemed institutes filed another petition with the Aurangabad bench of the Bombay High Court against a March circular of the Medical Council of India (MCI). According to this circular, all medical and dental institutes (government, private and deemed) will have to follow the CAP rounds to fill up their seats. Deemed as well as private institutes are against such control by the government