‘Maharashtra govt needs to check what went wrong with FYJC admissions last year’ | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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‘Maharashtra govt needs to check what went wrong with FYJC admissions last year’

To avoid a repeat of last year, activists want the state education department to check what went wrong in the first year junior college (FYJC) online admission process in 2016-17, before opening admissions for this year.

mumbai Updated: Mar 31, 2017 00:57 IST
Puja Pednekar
The audit report released by the government has, however, blamed students for the chaos, according to the reply to an RTI obtained by Pune NGO SYSCOM.
The audit report released by the government has, however, blamed students for the chaos, according to the reply to an RTI obtained by Pune NGO SYSCOM.(HT)

To avoid a repeat of last year, activists want the state education department to check what went wrong in the first year junior college (FYJC) online admission process in 2016-17, before opening admissions for this year.

The FYJC admissions, carried out through a centralised process, were marred by confusion last year, with complaints of students not getting seats in colleges of their choice, even after scoring higher than the cut-offs, among others.

The audit report released by the government has, however, blamed students for the chaos, according to the reply to an RTI obtained by Pune NGO SYSCOM. “The audit report is a farce. It says students didn’t fill the admission forms properly, but doesn’t explore why a large number of students didn’t get admission based on merit,” said Vaishali Bafna, member of SYSCOM, who had filed a petition in the Bombay high court against the haphazard manner in which the admissions were conducted.

Bafna said the report will not help the department iron out flaws in the process. “The department needs to take a deeper look at the admission process, so students don’t face similar problems. We suspect 35,000 offline admissions in Mumbai were illegal, but the department isn’t ready to examine the problem,” said Bafna.

BB Chavan, deputy director of education, said the report was prepared by third-party firms. “The report is impartial,” said Chavan. “Form-filling is a major problem. Students make mistakes while listing their preferences and then complain that they didn’t get a college of their choice.”

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