Maharashtra records rise in dengue cases | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Maharashtra records rise in dengue cases

This year, between January and September, the state recorded 2,500 dengue cases, while 1,600 cases were recorded during the corresponding period last year, said officials.

mumbai Updated: Sep 15, 2016 00:32 IST
Aayushi Pratap

As Delhi grapples with rising cases of chikungunya, in Maharashtra, the rapidly spreading dengue infection has emerged as a public health concern, said officials on Tuesday.

This year, between January and September, the state recorded 2,500 dengue cases, while 1,600 cases were recorded during the corresponding period last year, said officials.

The number of chikungunya cases in the state has more than doubled between January and September this year, said officials, adding that while 207 cases were reported last year, 439 cases have been recorded so far this year.

State public health department officials said stagnant rainwater accumulated in and around houses have turned into breeding sites for mosquitoes. Proliferation of breeding sites, has led to a spurt in vector-borne viral infections, including dengue and chikungunya.

While 10 dengue deaths were reported last year, this year two deaths have been recorded. Dr Kanchan Jagtap, state director for vector control, said, “While the number of dengue cases has increased, the deaths caused by the infection has gone down thanks to the dengue detection programme implemented in the state.”

“Almost 95% of all chikungunya cases have been reported in rural and urban Pune,” she added.

Dr Anita Mathew, infectious disease specialist, LTMG Sion Hospital and Fortis Hospital, Mulund, said she has sent 2 to 3 suspected cases of chikungunya for confirmatory tests. “We can’t negate the possibility of chikungunya infection cases in the city. While it is not as big a concern as dengue infection, Mumbaiites need to be alert,” she said.

Doctors have pointed out that the figures recorded by the state’s public health department include only those recorded in civic hospitals and not private ones.

Dr Om Srivastava, infectious disease specialist, said, “The statistics only include those recorded in civic-run hospitals. Moreover, the diagnostic tests for dengue are so diverse that it is impossible for one test to accurately pick up the infection during its duration, which is roughly 2 to 10 days.”