Maharashtra to hold its last typewriting exam this August | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Maharashtra to hold its last typewriting exam this August

Mumbai city news: With the state’s decision to go digital, more than 3,500 typing institutes and 10,000 instructors will be affected

mumbai Updated: Jun 12, 2017 09:20 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
More than seven lakh students appear for the Government Certificate in Computer Typing Basic Course (GCC-TBC) every year.
More than seven lakh students appear for the Government Certificate in Computer Typing Basic Course (GCC-TBC) every year.(Hindustan Times)

Adapt or die: That is the message the Maharashtra government is sending out to more than 3,500 typing institutes and 10,000 instructors across the state. With the state’s decision to go digital, the last manual typewriting exam will be held in August this year.

More than seven lakh students appear for the Government Certificate in Computer Typing Basic Course (GCC-TBC) every year. The certification, which tests typing agility, helps them land a better employment opportunity as government clerks or stenographers.

“No more extensions will be given to typing institutes for the GCC-TBC exams,” education minister Vinod Tawde told HT. He would not comment on the reasons why.

But the reasons are clear in a Government Resolution (GR) released in 2013. “Typewriting machines are outdated, manufacturers have shut shop and there are no spare parts available in market. We need computer trained individuals for government offices as we adapt to e-governance,” said the GR released on October 31, 2013 by Department of School Education and Sports on the issue.

The official communication had panicked typing institutes, who have stayed afloat with the help of extensions given by state government.

“We met chief minister Devendra Fadnavis last month and pleaded to fuse typewriting courses along with computer courses. He didn’t respond. And after being insulted by the education ministry, every time we ask for an extension, we don’t see a future,” said 71-year-old Prabhakar Dambal, chairman of Bombay (Mumbai) Commerce Educational Institute Association.

Dambal owns his own institute at Andheri, which was inaugurated by former chief minister of Maharashtra Vasantdada Patil in 1974. After spending five decades alongside typewriters to train students to improve their word-per-minute speed, Dambal said it’s a little difficult to switch to computers immediately.

Moreover, four semester’s exams on computers show that even students are finding it difficult to cope up with the change. “After deciding to abolish typewriters, the state government didn’t offer any particular syllabus or books. Students were taught from MS-CIT textbooks and merely 30% could clear the exams, against the typewriter exam result average of 80-90%,” said a state education department official.

“We pay registration fees every year. Students pays Rs200 as exam fees and add Rs14 crore to the state government’s coffers without any investment. What will they get by dragging us out on the roads,” asked Lalit Bhatti, who runs a typing institute in Kandivli.

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