Mumbai civic body tells private hospital to vacate ‘dilapidated’ building | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai civic body tells private hospital to vacate ‘dilapidated’ building

The trust claims the building cannot be considered dilapidated, as it was constructed only in 1988

mumbai Updated: Sep 12, 2017 10:09 IST
Eeshanpriya M S 
A notice was issued to The Muslim Ambulance Society diagnostic centre, housed in a building on Zakeria Masjid road.
A notice was issued to The Muslim Ambulance Society diagnostic centre, housed in a building on Zakeria Masjid road.(HT)

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) on Monday issued a notice to a private hospital to vacate a building in Masjid Bunder in 24 hours. The officials said the building falls in the C1 category — an extremely dilapidated building and dangerous for habitation. However, authorities have disputed the BMC’s notice. The trust claims the building cannot be considered dilapidated, as it was constructed only in 1988.

A notice was issued to The Muslim Ambulance Society diagnostic centre, a privately-run charitable hospital trust housed in Subani Parda municipal school building on Zakeria Masjid road. The B ward, which comprises Masjid Bunder, Dongri, and some portions of Bhendi Bazar and Mohammad Ali road, has four other buildings that fall in the C1 category, of which, only one has been vacated and demolished.

Uday Shiroorkar, assistant commissioner of the B ward, said, “I don’t want to take any chances with dilapidated buildings in this area, especially since this is a hospital where patients are admitted overnight. I have to think about the patients before taking other actions such as cutting its electricity and water supply.”

Following a structural audit of this ground+1 storey building conducted by B ward on July 31, BMC classified it in the C1 category, of highly dangerous and dilapidated buildings. It has served three notices to the trust since then. On Friday last week, Shiroorkar issued a warning notice to the hospital, cautioning it about the state of the building.

Dr Abdul Rauf Sumar, president of the Muslim Ambulance society which runs the hospital said, “We have countered BMC’s notice with a letter, asking to see the structural audit report. However, the civic body has refused to show it to us.” Sumar said since the hospital is a charitable trust, it provides healthcare to the poor at very cheap rates. There are 21 admitted to the hospital for dialysis at any point of time, and the centre carries out about 2000 dialysis cases a month.

When HT visited the hospital, a trustee claimed the BMC visited the building, and hammered out portions of a wall to take away concrete for testing. “That’s the only damage caused to the building”, he said.