Mumbai civic body to manage waste better | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai civic body to manage waste better

In July, the civic body had sought a two-month extension from the Bombay high court (HC) to prepare a waste management plan for the city.

mumbai Updated: Sep 07, 2017 10:21 IST
HT Correspondent 
In July, the civic body had sought a two-month extension from the Bombay high court (HC) to prepare a waste management plan for the city.
In July, the civic body had sought a two-month extension from the Bombay high court (HC) to prepare a waste management plan for the city.(HT File)

With the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) nearing the October 2 deadline, after which it will not pick up unsegregated waste from societies, it has decided to reduce waste collected from the city by more than 1,000 metric tonnes. At the beginning of the year, the BMC was collecting 8,722 metric tonnes of wet waste and by September the waste collected was reduced to 7,600 metric tonnes.

In July, the civic body had sought a two-month extension from the Bombay high court (HC) to prepare a waste management plan for the city. The HC also imposed a ban on new construction in the city until the BMC finds a way to manage waste. 

By December, BMC aims to reduce the waste collected to 6,000-6.500 metric tonnes from the city. “There are around 54 bulk generators in the city that alone generate 1,800 metric tonnes of waste a a which if processed will further reduces the amount of waste collected per day drastically,” said senior civic official from BMC’s solid waste management department. 

The highest number of bulk generators are in the K/West ward of Andheri — 565, who produce 71 metric tonnes of wet waste followed by 458 in the P/North ward of Goregaon who produce 152 metric tonnes of waste a day. The bulk generators have already been served a notice to install a waste processing unit in their premises. 

Starting October 2, the BMC will stop collecting wet waste from these bulk generators. The bulk generators include those establishments and housing societies that have an area of more than 20,000 square metres or those producing more than 100kg wet waste a day. 

Of the three dumping grounds in the city — Deonar, Mulund and Kanjurmarg — only the latter has facilities of scientifically processing waste. Deonar and Mulund have to be shut down as they have already reached their saturation point. The BMC is planning to set up a waste-to-energy plant in Deonar to shut it down. Meanwhile, it is also planning to increase the capacity at the Kanjurmarg dumping ground to process waste.