Mumbai FYJC admissions: Reservations are flawed, activists tell High Court | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 28, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Mumbai FYJC admissions: Reservations are flawed, activists tell High Court

System Correcting Movement (SYSCOM), an NGO in Pune which has an ongoing PIL in the HC, has recently filed an intervention claiming that the education department’s new rules were causing students from the general category to lose out on seats.

mumbai Updated: May 18, 2017 09:48 IST
Puja Pednekar
mumbai

Writing to education minister Vinod Tawde, SYSCOM alleged that the department’s new rules granting additional marks to students excelling in sports, arts and culture was not enough to get them a seat in a college of choice. (HT)

Education activists have filed an intervention in the Bombay high court saying that the reservations introduced for the first-year junior college (FYJC) admissions for 2017-18 were being implemented in a flawed manner.

System Correcting Movement (SYSCOM), an NGO in Pune which has an ongoing PIL in the HC, has recently filed an intervention claiming that the education department’s new rules were causing students from the general category to lose out on seats. For instance, benefits under the in-house quota can be availed by those studying in the same management’s schools in Mumbai, but on the condition that the school must be on the same campus. “Such rules are unfair because in a city like Mumbai, institutions run by the same management could be located in different campuses,” said Vaishali Bafna, one of the petitioners from SYSCOM.

Writing to education minister Vinod Tawde, SYSCOM alleged that the department’s new rules granting additional marks to students excelling in sports, arts and culture was not enough to get them a seat in a college of choice.

“According to the new rule, a student who has played a sport at the international level gets only 20 extra marks. But this is insufficient to get a seat in a college of choice because of the competition. “The special reservation for students (2% in arts and culture and 3% in sports) must instead be given on the basis of their performance in a sport or art form,” said Bafna.

In SYSCOM’s letter to the minister, the organisation said that the department’s rules were allowing some students to use both constitutional and special reservation benefits. “A student must be able to apply either in the SC, ST, OBC or other constitutional reservation categories, or under sports, arts or culture categories. The current seat distribution allows students to apply for both,” said the letter.

On the other hand, education officials from Mumbai said that the new rules were to be expected soon and would address all concerns. “We have received a lot of complaints over the new admission process, so we are looking into it and coming up with a new system,” said BB Chavan, deputy director of education, Mumbai division.