Mumbai law students file PIL against incorrect allotment of seats | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai law students file PIL against incorrect allotment of seats

mumbai Updated: Nov 13, 2016 23:32 IST
Musab Qazi
Law students

According to the petitioners, the state applied the female reservation vertically, instead of applying it horizontally - as demanded by the law. (HT file photo)

Two law students from the city have filed a public interest litigation (PIL) in Bombay high court (HC) against the state’s allotment of colleges during law admissions, which came to an end on Saturday.

In their petition, the students have said that the state Common Entrance Test (CET) Cell had allotted the seats under female reservation incorrectly. Claiming that thousands of male students didn’t get admission to their preferred law colleges owing to the CET cell’s actions, they have asked for a reallocation of seats.

The rules require 30% seats in higher education institutes to be reserved for woman candidates. According to the petitioners, the state applied the female reservation vertically, instead of applying it horizontally - as demanded by the law. Around 22,000 seats were available for three-year and five-year LLB courses in 128 law colleges across the state.

In case of vertical allotments, which are there for caste reservations, the candidates are first allotted seats under the general category and then quota seats are filled. However, in case of horizontal allotments, which are there for handicap and female students, the candidates are first allotted the seats under the quota and then they are offered general category seats are filled.

“We first made the CET cell aware of this error on September 15, right after the first list of allotments was released. While the officials accepted their mistake they made no efforts to correct it. Their claims of rectifying the error in the third list is false,” said Ashutosh Paibhale, one of the petitioners who was admitted to Government Law College, Churchgate.

The first list of allotment was revised after the state found that many minority students weren’t mentioned on it. Subsequently, the CET cell had to revamp the fourth list as well, after students complained of an error in it.

“If the state could alter the list once after the first allotments, they could have done it again. But it seems that they didn’t realise their mistake as they were conducting the Centralised Admission Process (CAP) for the first time,” said Paibhale.

The court will likely hear the matter this week.