Mumbai University team unearths medieval-era Buddhist stupas | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai University team unearths medieval-era Buddhist stupas

Mumbai city news: The team also found a rock-cut cave temple in Jogeshwari, a three-century-old dargah in Dharavi and a site strewn with pre-historic stone tool parts in Manori.

mumbai Updated: Jul 01, 2017 10:45 IST
Musab Qazi
The find is significant, they claimed, as it could lead to the discovery of the Buddhist monastery Budhh Vihar after which the lake is believed to have been named.
The find is significant, they claimed, as it could lead to the discovery of the Buddhist monastery Budhh Vihar after which the lake is believed to have been named. (HT photo)

A team from Mumbai University recently found remnants of Buddhist stupas near Virar lake. The find is significant, they claimed, as it could lead to the discovery of the Buddhist monastery Budhh Vihar after which the lake is believed to have been named.

The team also found a rock-cut cave temple in Jogeshwari, a three-century-old dargah in Dharavi and a site strewn with pre-historic stone tool parts in Manori.

The discoveries, which were announced on Friday, are the result of an archaeological exploration project by Centre for Extra-Mural Studies (CEM) of the Mumbai University, Sathaye College and INSTUCEN Trust. In an earlier study, the research team had found evidence of urban settlements in Mumbai dating back to the pre-Portuguese era. It’s generally believed that urban settlements in the city came into being only after the Portugese colonised the islands in 1534 that grew into Mumbai.

“Mumbai is more than the island city of Bombay. The mainland, which is often brushed aside as suburbs, is home to many historically important sites,” said Kurush Dalal, deputy director of CEM. The Salcette Exploration Project is named after Salcette (or Salsette) island on which Mumbai, Thane and Mira Road lie.

Currently, the researchers are only surveying archaeological sites on surface, as they are not authorised to carry out excavations. “We will submit our preliminary findings to Archaeological Survey of India and we hope that they will give permission to excavate,” said Mugdha Karnik, director of CEM.