Mumbaiites between 18 and 25, beware, you’re most vulnerable to road accidents: Study | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbaiites between 18 and 25, beware, you’re most vulnerable to road accidents: Study

Mumbai city news: Of the 51,979 people killed in car crashes between 2013 and 2016, as many as 16,403 (31%) were between 18 and 25

mumbai Updated: Jun 05, 2017 09:05 IST
Farhan Shaikh
Youngsters are most vulnerable to accidents owing to their refusal to follow road regulations and their penchant for speeding, say experts.
Youngsters are most vulnerable to accidents owing to their refusal to follow road regulations and their penchant for speeding, say experts.(HT File Photo)

Zipping along the state’s roads at high speeds, often without a helmet, seems like an attractive proposition for many young commuters. However, recent data accessed by HT reveals just how dangerous this is.

The data looked at people belonging to seven age groups and concluded that those between the ages of 18 and 25 were most vulnerable to road accidents. Of the 51,979 people killed in car crashes between 2013 and 2016, as many as 16,403 (31%) belonged to this age group.

“India ranks the highest in road crashes. Youngsters are most vulnerable to accidents owing to their refusal to follow road regulations and their penchant for speeding. Bikers form a major portion of those killed,” said Saji Cherian, director, SaveLife Foundation.

Data revealed that of the 23,463 drivers killed in accidents over the past four years, 8, 692 were between 18 and 25 years. Of the 27,751 passengers killed, 7,711 belonged to that age group.

These figures have worried not only motorists and passengers, but also transport authorities, especially as India signed the United Nation’s Brasilia Declaration last year, promising to halve its road accidents and fatalities by 2020.

The signatories met for the first time in April last year, to discuss means of dealing with non- motorised transport such as pedestrians and cyclists and what tests people should take before they are given a driving license. This included a discussion on unified driving licenses, the use of automation, mandatory training for, and periodic license renewal, according to the press information bureau.

“The declaration is a positive step. For the first time, we have spoken about reducing crashes and have taken a major step by amending the legislation,” said Cherian.

However, change is slow. While 226 fewer people were killed in road accidents in 2014, compared to 2013, the figure rose in 2015, with 409 more people dying in crashes as against the previous year. In 2016, 227 fewer people died in crashes, compared to 2015’s toll.

With the statistics of one year nullifying the previous year’s progress, road fatalities in India continue to remain a topic that needs to be addressed urgently.