Nursing aspirants may get admission based on their Class 12 marks | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Nursing aspirants may get admission based on their Class 12 marks

mumbai Updated: Nov 05, 2016 00:27 IST
Musab Qazi
Musab Qazi
Hindustan Times
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Avani Oke, principal, KJ Somiaya College of Nursing, said that while there has been a surge in enrollments, demand for the nursing course remains low, despite huge requirement for nurses in the hospitals across the state. (Representational photo)

Nursing aspirants, who failed to take the mandatory entrance examination, might get admitted to the undergraduate nursing course on the basis of their Class 12 marks.

With no takers for around 1,000 out of 3,000 seats available for BSc Nursing programme across the state, the Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) has asked the state government to forego the Common Entrance Test (CET) requirements for admission to the course. A similar number of seats are vacant in homeopathy course, even as most of the seats in other health science courses, such as ayurveda, unani, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and audiology have been filled.

While the admission to private dental and medical colleges in the state took place on the basis of National Entrance-cum-Eligibility Test (NEET), owing to a Supreme Court order in April, the admissions for the state-run medical and dental colleges, as well as all the private and government institutes offering allied health science courses admitted the aspirants through the state conducted CET.

While the SC’s decision on NEET and the subsequent chaos delayed the admission to medical and dental colleges, the admission to the allied health science courses were also pushed ahead as colleges waited for approvals from their respective apex regulatory bodies. With some colleges receiving their approvals only recently, the state government has decided to continue the admissions till November 30, even though the Centralised Admission Process (CAP) for admission to these courses got over more than a week ago.

Avani Oke, principal, KJ Somiaya College of Nursing, said that the uncertainty and delay in medical and dental admissions has taken a toll on allied courses as well. “The aspirants opt for allied courses when they fail to secure a seat in a medical college,” she said.

She added that while there has been a surge in enrollments, demand for the nursing course remains low, despite huge requirement for nurses in the hospitals across the state. “After Class 12, many students go for the more affordable diploma course in nursing, instead of the undergraduate programme. Others don’t want to get into nursing due to low salaries and work pressure,” she said.

While Oke believes that doing away with the CET will bring more students to nursing, she wants the students to be screened before they are accepted for the course.