With international stents being withdrawn, Indian manufacturers step up production | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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With international stents being withdrawn, Indian manufacturers step up production

Doctors said that there is not a single study to show that Indian stents are at par with FDA approved stents.

mumbai Updated: Feb 21, 2017 09:51 IST
Aayushi Pratap
stents
Stents are devices used to prop open blocked ducts, canals, or blood vessels.(FIle photo)

After many international stent manufacturers took to withdrawing their stents from hospitals as the government slashed its prices, manufacturers in India have now increased production in the hopes of filling the gap between the demand and supply.

Stents are devices used to prop open blocked ducts, canals, or blood vessels. A Kolkata–based stent manufacturer said that he is expecting his business to grow in the coming days. “The National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA) has made it clear that Indian stents are at par with international stents. If doctors don’t have the option of using international stents, they will have to use the Indian ones. So, our sales are sure to increase significantly,” he said.

“Moreover, with the stent prices being slashed, the numbers of angioplasties will increase as the procedure has become more affordable,” he added.

Another manufacturer from Hyderabad said, “We have been exporting our products to Europe and Malaysia. But it is only Indian doctors who have shown resistance to using Indian stents.”

He added, “We are hoping that after this move by the government, there will be a spike in the usage of Indian stents,” he added.

Doctors are, however, sceptical about using Indian stents.

Dr Samuel Mathew Kalarickal told HT that there is not a single study to show that Indian stents are at par with FDA approved stents. “If the government says that there is no difference between FDA approved and Indian stents, and if something goes wrong, they are to be blamed for it, not the doctors,” he said.

Also read:Lawyer with a heart: Birender Sangwan’s fight to cap price of coronary stents