150 city cops prepare for MBA exams | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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150 city cops prepare for MBA exams

Murdhar Karpe, 35, an assistant inspector with the city police, is a nervous man these days. It’s not the rising crime rate in the city that is giving this policeman sleepless nights.

mumbai Updated: Apr 25, 2011 00:47 IST
Mohamed Thaver

Murdhar Karpe, 35, an assistant inspector with the city police, is a nervous man these days. It’s not the rising crime rate in the city that is giving this policeman sleepless nights. Karpe’s cause for anxiety is what terrorises school and college students year after year: his exams are approaching.

For the first time, around 150 city policemen are taking first year exams of masters in business administration (MBA) in human resources and management to be held from May 16-21.

The two-year course meant for the Maharashtra police was initiated in May last year in association with the Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU). A total of 1,100 policemen from across the state applied for the course.

Policemen who are either graduates or have completed their police sub-inspector (PSI) level training from the police academy at Nashik are eligible for the course. It has features ensuring the policemen would not have to stretch their hectic schedule.

Shashikant Mane, inspector (protection and security) said, “It’s a correspondence course so we do not have to attend classes. The study material is sent to the policemen and one can revert to the university in case of any doubt. Also, doing an MBA course in regular colleges costs a lot. Here we just have to pay Rs10,000 for the two-year course, that is inclusive of all expenses.”

Mane will be part of the second batch and has applied for admissions this year.

When asked about the relevance of the course, Karpe, a science graduate who has also holds a masters degree in law, said: “We have two major subjects — public policy and management that is further broken down into three sub-topics each. These topics are relevant to our day-to-day policing duty as well.”

“We get to learn things that help us approach our job in a smarter and effective manner.”

What about making time to study? “First while travelling in the train from Kandivli to CST station I used to read the newspapers. Now I carry the study material and read it while travelling to and fro,” said Karpe, who is currently attached to the protection and security branch of the Mumbai police.

He added, “It’s not like I have to force myself to study. The topics are interesting and I am keen to start reading as soon as I get in the train.”

Dr Anuradha Deshmukh, director, centre for collaboration of special initiatives under the YCMOU, said, “While designing the course for the police, our focus was on the human resources aspect since the police deal with public on a daily basis.”

Rajneesh Seth, joint commissioner of police, law and order, said, “It is a generalised course. It was started a year ago for policemen who have the desire to study further.”