5-mark Class 10 maths question ‘defective’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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5-mark Class 10 maths question ‘defective’

mumbai Updated: May 02, 2012 01:15 IST
Bhavya Dore
Bhavya Dore
Hindustan Times
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The state board asked students to answer a five-mark question in this year’s Mathematics (Geometry) exam that is ‘defective’, according to a letter from a Ruia College professor to the board. The Class 10 state board exams ended in March.


The contentious problem asks students to solve a sum based on Archimedes’ Principle, but the answer cannot be arrived at, as the data provided in the question is insufficient, Vikram Karandikar, the professor, has alleged. The board has in response, claimed that since the problem is arithmetically solveable, there is nothing wrong with it. “It needs to be understood that any problem that is coined should not only be solvable arithmetically but it should also be correct and logical from the point of view of its physical interpretation,” said Karandikar, in his second letter to the board dated April 18.

Karandikar has also pointed out a one-mark error in the Marathi translation of the Science paper, saying that in the translation a question on current carrying conductors has been wrongly translated, thus becoming a different question altogether.

In a reply to Karandikar, the state board has addressed both issues. In the matter of the Maths problem, the board has said the sum is valid since it can be solved arithmetically. In the issue of the Marathi translation error the board has said it is simply a different sentence construction.

Karandikar has however argued, that since both questions are ambiguous, students who attempted them should be given full marks for both.

State board officials when contacted said they received many queries and allegations on exam questions after the exams.

“The expert committee decides on the issue after deliberations and takes a decision accordingly,” said S Dhekane, secretary of the board. “In this particular case I do not remember what the outcome was.”

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