60 tonnes of floral waste collected from mandals | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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60 tonnes of floral waste collected from mandals

The Brihan Mumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has collected 60 tonnes of floral offering (nirmalya), which would have been dumped in the sea, in the past four days from various Ganesh mandals at its 16 collection points.

mumbai Updated: Sep 06, 2011 00:45 IST
HT Correspondent

The Brihan Mumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has collected 60 tonnes of floral offering (nirmalya), which would have been dumped in the sea, in the past four days from various Ganesh mandals at its 16 collection points.

In an eco-friendly move, the civic body will prepare compost from this organic waste. It is also getting positive response from organisations such as Siddhivinayak temple trust. The response has been much better as nirmalya has increased by around 5-20% compared to last year, said civic officials.

Nirmalya comprises flowers, garlands and coconuts offered to the deity. It also includes decoration material. The civic body started separation of nirmalya to make compost fertiliser a few years ago with the help of local management groups and social organisations.

The BMC has various collection points including major Ganesh mandals. A van has been deployed in each ward to collect the nirmalya from mandals as well as immersion points. As on Sunday, 60 tonnes nirmalya has been collected in four days. 26 tonnes were collected from western suburb, 18 from island city and 16 tonnes from eastern suburb.

“We make compost to save the environment and now we are getting huge response from various social institutions and also private parties,” said Subhash Patil, an officer from civic solid waste management department. The BMC, in a joint initiative with the Brihanmumbai Sarvajanik Ganesh Utsav Samanvay Samiti, United Way, Prayag, Orchid hotel and Pestam Sagar colony in Chembur, will carry out the composting.

Mangesh Shinde, chief executive officer of Siddhivinayak Trust, said: “We have planned to make compost from the nirmalya from this year.”