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All FYJC admissions to go online this year

mumbai Updated: May 11, 2016 01:02 IST
Puja Pednekar
College

Since the government has decided not to have any offline admissions this year, except in-house, minority and management quota, coaching institutes will not be able to guarantee admissions to junior colleges.(HT Photo)

Students aspiring for admissions to integrated courses - where junior colleges have an arrangement with coaching classes - will have to apply online for First Year Junior College (FYJC) admissions this year. The deputy directorate of education has asked colleges not admit any general category students directly, even for specialised courses.

Integrated courses are popular with students as they prepare students for engineering or medical entrance exam and save students time as they do not have to attend classes and college separately.

In the past, the directorate had observed that many colleges had entered into tie-ups with coaching classes to offer such integrated courses. Some of these institutes would enrol students in the coaching class even before the Class 10 results were announced and assure them admission to their partner college. There were allegations of malpractices, with some tutorials reported to have offered seats in colleges for extra fees.

However, since the government has decided not to have any offline admissions this year, except in-house, minority and management quota, coaching institutes will not be able to guarantee admissions to junior colleges.

“All admissions for general category students this year will be done through the online process,” said BB Chavan, deputy director of education, Mumbai region. “Colleges will not be able to break this rule as there will be strict monitoring and third party checks.”

Compliance to the rules will be checked with help of a unique identification (UID) number, which has been made mandatory for all FYJC aspirants this year, even if they want admission through quota. The UID number will be used for tracking students.

Working around these rules, colleges have no choice but to admit students through online admissions this year. These colleges have enrolled students in their partnering coaching classes for now and then will admit them through online admissions.

“Students enrolled in our coaching classes want to study in our junior college as well,” said Pravin Tyagi, managing director of a Pace junior colleges. “So we ask them to apply for the college in the online admissions and since they are all high scorers, they are confident of securing a seat in the college.”

Similarly, some of the colleges have weaved in coaching into their regular teaching itself. “We do not offer any integrated course separately,” said Ashok Wadia, principal, Jai Hind College, Churchgate. “If students want any special coaching, they approach our teachers, who help them out.”

Some colleges such as Wilson College, Grant Road, have entered into unofficial arrangements with coaching classes. “We have an unofficial understanding with a private coaching institute, they hold classes in our premises and interested students opt for it,” said VJ Sirwaiya, principal of the college. “It is a good arrangement especially for outstation students who live in our hostel.”

Students seeking admission to integrated courses at the First Year Junior College (FYJC) level will have to apply online this year. The deputy directorate of education has asked colleges not to admit any general category student directly, even for specialised courses.

Integrated courses are popular with students. These courses not only prepare students for engineering or medical entrance exams, but also help students save on time as they do not have to attend classes and college separately.

In the past, the directorate had observed that many colleges had entered into tie-ups with coaching classes to offer such integrated courses. Some of these institutes would enrol students in the coaching class even before the Class 10 results were announced and assure them admission in their partner college. There were allegations of malpractices, with some tutorials reported to have offered seats in colleges for extra fees.

However, since the government has decided not to have any offline admissions this year, except in-house, minority and management quota, coaching institutes will not be able to guarantee admissions to junior colleges.

“All admissions for general category students this year will be done online. There will be strict monitoring and third-party checks to ensure colleges follow this rule,” said BB Chavan, deputy director of education, Mumbai region.

Compliance to the rules will be checked with the help of a unique identification (UID) number, which has been made mandatory for all FYJC aspirants this year, even if they want admission through quota. The UID number will be used to track students’ applications.

In accordance with these rules, colleges will have to enrol students in their partnering coaching classes through online admissions.

“Students enrolled in our coaching classes want to study in our junior college as well. So, we have asked them to apply online. Since they are all high scorers, they are confident of securing a seat in college,” said Pravin Tyagi, managing director of Pace junior colleges.

Similarly, some colleges have weaved in coaching into their regular teaching itself. “We do not offer any integrated course separately. If students want any special coaching, they approach our teachers, who help them out,” said Ashok Wadia, principal, Jai Hind College, Churchgate.

Some colleges such as Wilson College, Grant Road, have entered into unofficial arrangements with coaching classes. “We have an unofficial understanding with a private coaching institute. They conduct classes in our premises and interested students opt for it,” said VJ Sirwaiya, the college’s principal. “It is a good arrangement especially for outstation students who live in our hostel.”