‘Balanced individuals don’t harm others’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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‘Balanced individuals don’t harm others’

Though dealing with break-ups is always difficult, not everybody is inclined towards physically harming either themselves or the other person concerned, said Dr Nilesh Shah, head, psychiatry, Sion hospital.

mumbai Updated: Aug 06, 2012 01:19 IST
Mohamed Thaver

Though dealing with break-ups is always difficult, not everybody is inclined towards physically harming either themselves or the other person concerned, said Dr Nilesh Shah, head, psychiatry, Sion hospital.

“People with an anti-social personality or borderline personality are highly sensitive to such situations. Such a change [break-up or rejection] in their life leads to impulsive reactions and mood swings. They become self-destructive. Some also feel victimised and hence try to kill the other person who has caused them pain,” said Shah.

“On very rare occasions do balanced individuals go to the extent of physically harming anybody,” he said.

Explaining the reason behind the disorders in personality, sociologist Nandini Sardesai said, “Earlier, the joint family system ensured strong ties with kin. But, the emergence of the nuclear family system changed it all, making people more vulnerable.”

“Excessive exposure to the media is also one of the reasons behind impulsive behaviour. Spouses expect more from their marriage. When they feel that their expectations are not being met, they look outside for solace, thus leading to extramarital affairs and its complications.”

According to former police commissioner MN Singh, the rise in the number of murders because of love affairs is a recent trend. “I don’t think earlier there were as many murders because of love affairs. Jealousy-driven murders is a relatively urban phenomenon.”