BMC spent your Rs 21 lakh to fight its staff in court | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 22, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

BMC spent your Rs 21 lakh to fight its staff in court

The municipal corporation has spent more than Rs 21 lakh of the taxpayers' money to appeal in the Supreme Court in eight cases filed against its own employees.

mumbai Updated: Dec 26, 2010 02:00 IST
Sujit Mahamulkar

The municipal corporation has spent more than Rs 21 lakh of the taxpayers' money to appeal in the Supreme Court in eight cases filed against its own employees.

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) had lost these cases in the Bombay high court, found a Congress corporator when he enquired with the civic law department.

Now, the corporators are against the BMC's idea of appealing to the Supreme Court and want the administration to adhere to the high court ruling instead of spending more of the taxpayers' money.

“An employee is usually burdened with the internal departmental politics. But, after a point, these employees take the legal route and file cases,” said Rajendraprasad Chaube, Congress corporator.

Of the 91 cases that the BMC lost in the industrial court, it appealed against eight cases in the high court, and lost again.

Subsequently, the BMC approached the Supreme Court for which the administration has paid more than Rs 21 lakh as advocate fee. The BMC has explained this in the statement issued by civic law department.

Of these eight cases, two are pending, while the rest have been disposed of.

"The BMC has lost six cases even in the Supreme Court," said an official from the civic law department, on the condition of anonymity for lack of authorisation to talk to media.

Rajendra Vale, deputy municipal commissioner who handles the general administration department, justified: “Usually we approach the upper
court if the lower court verdict affects our policy as it would set a precedent.”

“If the lower court or the high court’s decision goes against the BMC’s policy, it means our policy needs to be upgraded. But instead of trying to amend the policy, the administration approaches the Supreme Court,” said Chaube. “The civic administration should utilise the same manpower to fight other BMC-related cases that are pending. There are more than a lakh of such cases.”

Advocate Gyanmurti Sharma, chairman of the civic law committee, suggested: “The BMC administration should make policies such a way that no employee needs to go against it in the court.”