BMC wants to process mixed waste | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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BMC wants to process mixed waste

Dismayed by the poor response received by citizens towards segregating wet and dry waste, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has decided to explore technologies that can be installed at the city’s three dumping grounds to process unsegregated waste.

mumbai Updated: Nov 29, 2012 01:29 IST
Poorvi Kulkarni

Dismayed by the poor response received by citizens towards segregating wet and dry waste, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has decided to explore technologies that can be installed at the city’s three dumping grounds to process unsegregated waste.

In a meeting of the BMC-appointed technical advisory committee, scheduled in the first week of December, the civic body plans to focus on technologies that wouldn’t require citizens to segregate their trash.

The committee, comprising experts from National Environmental Engineering Research Institute and Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay and social activists, was formed earlier this month to review waste disposal and make recommendations on other methods that can be adopted.

“Considering the composition of the waste generated in the city, which is often unsegregated, we are looking at installing technologies that can process mixed waste,” said Mohan Adtani, additional municipal commissioner.

“If we find operators for such technologies, the need to segregate waste at source can be ruled out,” he added.

One such technology that is being seriously considered is a waste-to-energy plant, which utilises unsegregated waste to produce electricity. The plant uses combustion of waste to generate steam, which is in turn passed through a turbine to generate power.

Currently, the composting plants at the Deonar and Kanjurmarg dumping grounds can only process wet waste.

According to the Municipal Solid Waste Rules, 2000, segregation at source by citizens is mandatory. It is also one of the service level benchmarks to be achieved by the BMC to continue receiving funds under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission scheme.

But civic officials claim that only 15% of the waste generated gets segregated at source, which has also disturbed the BMC’s system of dry waste collection and sorting in some wards.