Cancel Uran college’s affiliation to varsity | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Cancel Uran college’s affiliation to varsity

“Education has become a major source of corruption,” said Justice PB Majmudar of the Bombay High Court.

mumbai Updated: Dec 07, 2010 00:42 IST
HT Correspondent

“Education has become a major source of corruption,” said Justice PB Majmudar of the Bombay High Court.

Justice Majmudar and Justice Mridula Bhatkar on Monday directed the University of Mumbai to cancel the affiliation of Uran Education Society’s College of Management and Computer Science, Raigad district, for giving admission to an ineligible student.

“The respondent (college) has acted in very irresponsible manner,” observed the division bench of the high court. “Cancel their affiliation. Set an example for other colleges indulging in similar malpractices.”

The bench said that by giving admission to an ineligible student, Swanand Agharkar, 19, the institution had deprived an eligible candidate from pursing Bachelor of Science (Information Technology) course. While the university has set eligibility criteria of minimum 45% in HSC, Agharkar had secured 43.67%.

Counsel for the university, Rui Rodrigues, then pointed out that the varsity has come across several such incidences.

What irked the judges more was the fact that the chairman of the education society was a builder. The institution had given admission to Agharkar for the first-year in June 2009, but the university found that that he was ineligible for the course only in September 2010.

On September 17, the university wrote to the college intimating it that the student, who was then in his third semester, could not have been admitted because he was ineligible.

The college, in turn, informed Agharkar about the impending cancellation of his admission on October 22. Agharkar then moved the high court contending he could not be punished for a mistake committed by the college.

His counsel, Suhas Oak, pointed out that Agharkar had not suppressed any information from either the college or the university, and if his admission were cancelled now, he would lose one-and-a-half year.

On Monday, Oak urged the court to allow Agharkar provisionally to attend classes because he has completed two semesters. The judges said they would consider the request on December 20, when the case will be heard next.