City sweats it out on a dry, humid Sunday | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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City sweats it out on a dry, humid Sunday

High humidity levels — 88 per cent in Colaba and 75 per cent in Santacruz — ensured those out to enjoy the holiday were drenched in sweat.

mumbai Updated: Jun 21, 2010 01:47 IST
HT Correspondent

The city has not received rainfall in 24 hours but that did not mean Mumbaiites were dry.

High humidity levels — 88 per cent in Colaba and 75 per cent in Santacruz — ensured those out to enjoy the holiday were drenched in sweat.

The city did not receive rain on Sunday but the Meteorological department said there is no cause for worry.

“A one-day gap in rainfall is not such a bad thing,” said a duty officer from the Indian Meteorological Department. “This happens. It’s normal weather pattern.”

Rainfall measurements are taken at weather stations situated at Colaba and Santacruz. “Just because we have not measured heavy rainfall in these two locations it does not mean it hasn’t rained at all in other parts of the city,” said the official.

But the cloudy weather gave hope. “It’s dark and looks like when it begins to rain again it will pour,” said Sunetra Chauhan, a financial planner.

Meanwhile, continuous rain over the past few days seemed to have weakened a three-storey building at Wagle Estate.

A portion of the second floor of Rukmini Sadan building collapsed and fell into a drain near Ganesh Chowk at Wagle Estate on Sunday evening. Nobody was injured.

The slabs that collapsed were common to the kitchen of one house and the hall of another.

“The building is more than 25 years old and is illegal. We will have to check whether this building was among the list of dilapidated structures,” said Deputy Municipal Commissioner (Anti-Encroachment) B. G. Pawar.

The building is home to 16 families who have been evacuated, Pawar said. The residents have been shifted to a temporary shelter in Vartaknagar.

Shiv Sena legislator Eknath Shinde called the building a “high-rise slum”.

“There are many dilapidated structures, which collapse during monsoons. The state and municipal corporation should frame a policy for reconstructing these buildings on humanitarian grounds,” Shinde said.