Cops trained to draft FIRs | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 26, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Cops trained to draft FIRs

Alarmed by the poor conviction rate of its cases in courts, the Maharashtra police have roped in a public prosecutor to help its officers improve their first information report (FIR) drafting and legal paperwork skills.

mumbai Updated: Oct 17, 2010 00:55 IST
Shailendra Mohan

Alarmed by the poor conviction rate of its cases in courts, the Maharashtra police have roped in a public prosecutor to help its officers improve their first information report (FIR) drafting and legal paperwork skills.

Ajay Misar, a leading public prosecutor who is the Central Bureau of Invetigation’s (CBI) special counsel, conducted a workshop in the city on October 12, where he guided around 80 police officers from Mumbai on how to draft FIRs.

He also told them how to take down statements and prepare documents that are to be presented in court.

According to Misar, the workshop dealt with pointing out reasons for failure of cases during trial at sessions courts, and ways to improve conviction rate of cases in the state.

“The state had abysmal conviction rate last year and the reason for that is manifold,” said Misar, adding that several mistakes are committed at the time of registering an FIR and also later at the time of preparing other documents, including during recording of statements.

Misar said that police officers fail to apply the concerned Sections, thereby weakening the case.

“They do not show keen interest while preparing documents and so the cases fall flat before the court. The police officers should at least be aware of the proper Sections they need to apply while dealing with sensitive and serious cases like murder and rape,” he added. Misar also stressed on the need for the police to use good panchas for witness.

The conviction rate in Maharashtra in 2007 was 11.1%, which further dipped to 9.4% in 2008.

Misar is expected to conduct similar workshops in the state in Konkan and Nashik.
According to Himanshu Roy, joint commissioner of police (crime), such a workshop would definitely help his men and would also help the police department better its record, when it came to nailing the accused.

Arun Jadhav, a police inspector with the crime branch, said the workshop was very helpful as they realised that even small details matter at the time of prosecution. “We were asked to keep ourselves updated with laws and sections, which would help us get better conviction rate. That in turn would help bring down crime,” said Jadhav.