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Court accepts documents CBI discarded

mumbai Updated: Jun 21, 2011 01:19 IST
Urvi Mahajani
Urvi Mahajani
Hindustan Times
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In the last leg of the trial into the murder of Jalgaon District Congress Committee (DCC) president Vishram Patil, the sessions court has taken note of the documents discarded by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) while submitting the charge sheet.

Arguing that the CBI had failed to attach documents with the charge sheet, Mahesh Jethmalani, counsel for Rajni Patil, widow of Vishram Patil, submitted the documents to the court.

Vishram Patil was found murdered on September 21, 2005. It was alleged that the murder was a consequence of an intra-party rivalry between Vishram, GN Patil -- brother of president Pratibha Patil -- and Ulhas Patil, as GN Patil lost the DCC poll to Vishram.

With Jethmalani’s submission, sessions judge at Jalgaon, MR Puranik, prepared “on record” panchnamas by taking Raju Sonawane, the main accused, to the spot of the crime and to the places where he met GN Patil and Ulhas Patil. While Sonawane is facing the trial, other accused Raju Mali succumbed to his illness in custody in April 2007.

During the panchnama, Sonawane directed the police to Godavari Maternity Home, Jalgaon, where he went with Mali on September 16, 2005. There, they met a person whom Mali told that he will get Vishram eliminated in 2-4 days and asked the person to ensure that they are released on bail, states the panchnama. The police later learned that the maternity home belonged to Ulhas Patil.

Sonawane also took the police to a building near Nirmal Clinic owned by local Congress leader Jayant Patil, the name by which GN Patil is known locally. Jethmalani submitted Mali’s statement recorded by Jalgaon police on October 1, 2005, stating that he had sought assurance from GN Patil and Ulhas Patil that they will help him get out of the case.

In a letter written by Mali from his deathbed, he had admitted to the murder The court will decide next week whether to take cognisance of Mali's statement and the letter.