Court receiver can sell electronic media rights of chori chori... | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Court receiver can sell electronic media rights of chori chori...

Decks have been cleared for the court receiver to enter into an agreement to sell electronic media rights of the film Chori Chori Chupke Chupke (CCCC), which exposed the alleged Bollywood-underworld nexus.

mumbai Updated: Dec 01, 2010 01:05 IST
Urvi Mahajani

Decks have been cleared for the court receiver to enter into an agreement to sell electronic media rights of the film Chori Chori Chupke Chupke (CCCC), which exposed the alleged Bollywood-underworld nexus.

The Bombay High Court on Tuesday dismissed the petition filed by Mega Bollywood Private Limited, which had partially financed the Salman Khan-Preity Zinta starrer and had acquired the world rights control of CCCC, seeking restrain on the court receiver – former investigating officer Shankar Kamble – from signing the agreement for electronic media rights for seven years beginning November 2012.

Justice Rekha Sondur-Baldota dismissed the petition stating that the special court, which had tried the case against film financer and diamond merchant Bharat Shah and producer of CCCC Nazim Rizvi, had already dealt with the issue.

While dismissing the petition, Justice Sondur-Baldota upheld the contention of Rizvi’s counsel Sayaji Nangre that the special court had dismissed similar applications by Mega Bollywood in 2001 and hence they did not have the right to challenge the agreement.

Also, Mega Bollywood has not challenged the orders of the special court, hence they have finality, Nangre had argued.

Senior counsel Virag Tulzapurkar while arguing for Mega Bollywood said that the electronic media copyrights could not be sold since they had had the world rights controls. Besides, he alleged that they apprehend that the movie rights are being sold for pittance and alleged possibility of underhand dealings.

Mega Bollywood had acquired the world right control of CCCC in October 1999. It had paid Rs 12.07 crore towards its production through cheques, states the petition.