Court relief for management institutes in Maharashtra | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Court relief for management institutes in Maharashtra

mumbai Updated: Feb 25, 2011 01:57 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Management aspirants, who had qualified five national management tests, would be eligible to get admission in the 81 private-unaided management institutions across the state for the next academic year.

The Bombay high court on Thursday restrained Maharashtra government from conducting a Common Entrance Test (CET) for admitting students in the post-graduate diploma in business management (PGDBM) courses conducted by 81 private-unaided management institutions across the state.

As an interim arrangement for the next academic year, 2011-12, a division bench comprising chief justice Mohit Shah and justice SJ Vazifdar allowed members of the Consortium of Management Education to admit students qualified in five national admission tests. The arrangement is made, as the consortium now would not be able to conduct its own CET.

The Consortium of Management Education, an association of private-unaided business schools in Maharashtra, had moved high court through advocate ML Acharya challenging state government’s decision to conduct a CET for admitting students in the PGDBM courses in these private institutions.

When the consortium was in the process of holding its own CET, in accordance with the Supreme Court orders regarding professional education in January, the state announced schedule for holding a CET.

The consortium contended its members had unfettered right to choose students to be admitted in their institutions subject to conditions laid down by the Supreme Court — that the process must be merit-based, transparent and non-exploitative. It further contended the state’s decision to conduct a CET for admitting students in their institutions was a violation of their fundamental right.

Anil Anturkar, counsel for All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), on the other hand submitted that the consortium represented only 52 out of total 81 management institutions in the state. He had stated that AICTE would not have any objection to allowing them to conduct their own CET if all the institutions join the consortium.

Ashutosh Kumbhakoni, who represented the consortium, however, pointed out that it was impossible for them to conduct single CET for all its members, as subjects offered by them were diverse - from healthcare management to IT.

The bench admitted the petition for final hearing while allowing the consortium members to admit students qualified in five national level tests for next academic year. The consortium, however, will have to conduct its own common admission process, which will consist of group discussion and personal interview.

The court also granted similar relief to the Institute of Technology, which runs five management institutions in various states, including Maharashtra.